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blackrose

Worst boat names

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1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

What is a 'Reefer' then ?

 

An articulated vehicle with an insulated trailer body fitted with a fridge unit.

Usually prefaced by "bleedin' "

1 hour ago, Athy said:

A for 'orses

B for mutton

C for miles

D for dumb

F for vescence

...

L for leather

...

O for the wings of a dove

...

Q for a bus

R for mo

...

T for two

...

X for breakfast

  • Greenie 2

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32 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

Forgot G for police, I for novello, M for sis, V for La France and Y for Gawd's sake

I remember most of those! "O for the wings of a dove" isn't what we used to say though - but I can't recall what "our" version was. I suppose it'll be on the internet somewhere.

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Could be "O for Gawd's sake" I suppose.

I remember them from music rehearsals back in the year dot, but most scores don't go beyond about G or H!

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3 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

What is a 'Reefer' then ?

When I was a student in the early '70s there was a song called "Convoy" (the film came from the song, not the other way round).  We were perplexed by some of the expressions, including "cab over Pete with a reefer on".  We had an American exchange student with us for a while who explained that "cab over Pete" meant the cab is over the engine (normal in Europe, but many American trucks had the engine under a big bonnet in front)  and "with a reefer on" meant it had a refrigeration unit fitted.

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Good info, Dor. Yes, C.W. McCall's song was a hit in 1975 and the film came along a few years later.

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11 minutes ago, dor said:

When I was a student in the early '70s there was a song called "Convoy" (the film came from the song, not the other way round).  We were perplexed by some of the expressions, including "cab over Pete with a reefer on".  We had an American exchange student with us for a while who explained that "cab over Pete" meant the cab is over the engine (normal in Europe, but many American trucks had the engine under a big bonnet in front)  and "with a reefer on" meant it had a refrigeration unit fitted.

You obviously didn’t watch enough US trucking programmes....such as Movin on, BJ & the bear etc...I was only a small kid but I knew that. “Pete” means a Peterbuilt btw...a make of truck...I’m still a sad truck geek....

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On 13/08/2019 at 09:27, frangar said:

I always think that some owners never think they may need to say or phonetically spell the name over VHF at some point....makes me glad to be called Doris! 

Why should it  be difficult to spell a boat name phonetically? I've had 50 year sea sailing 11 years full time, its not rocket science. Yer may be you right some folk eh .

Edited by CLAN1
Added text

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16 minutes ago, dor said:

When I was a student in the early '70s there was a song called "Convoy" (the film came from the song, not the other way round).  We were perplexed by some of the expressions, including "cab over Pete with a reefer on".  We had an American exchange student with us for a while who explained that "cab over Pete" meant the cab is over the engine (normal in Europe, but many American trucks had the engine under a big bonnet in front)  and "with a reefer on" meant it had a refrigeration unit fitted.

Yes, a reefer is a refridgerated vehicle on road or rail.

 

In order to work inside such vehicles staff would be issued with thick short overcoats which were also called reefers.

 

My last known use of such coats was the one issued to BR footplate staff in steam days.  Very useful in winter, especially when running tender first!

 

George

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4 minutes ago, CLAN1 said:

Why should it  be difficult to spell a boat name phonetically? I've had 50 year sea sailing 11 years full time, its not rocket science. Yer may be you right some folk eh .

It’s a bit tedious when you’ve given it a rather long name....or a particularly daft one

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4 hours ago, David Mack said:

 

Well if its the Que Sera Sera I'm not surprised it is covered in security stuff!

 

Yer it is that one, making it all the more ironic in my opinion! Still don't know why they need a dozen security lights burning with the intensity of a the sun.

 

Off topic, the does anyone have a link for the end of the Stolen Boat thread? Was curious about it getting found, but hte various threads just petered out

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On 13/08/2019 at 08:42, Slim said:

KNACKERED NAVVY

That was our boat and we were knackered when we finished it. You have the spelling wrong because we spelt it Nackered Navvy

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7 minutes ago, CLAN1 said:

Why should it  be difficult to spell a boat name phonetically? I've had 50 year sea sailing 11 years full time, its not rocket science. Yer may be you right some folk eh .

like many things in life I suppose. We all have things we are good at and some we struggle with. My bete noire is getting out of bed in the morning!:cheers:

 

Howard

 

 

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25 minutes ago, frangar said:

It’s a bit tedious when you’ve given it a rather long name....or a particularly daft one

Many years ago (very early '80s) we bought a Bayliner that was named "Wet Wet Wet" (presumably after the band).

 

It became a real chore when calling up the Coastguard to inform them of our departure to repeat the boat name 3 times (as required)

 

Holyhead Coastguard this is "Wet Wet Wet, Wet Wet Wet,  Wet  Wet  Wet", and then their response "Wet Wet Wet, Wet Wet Wet,  Wet  Wet  Wet - go ahead"

 

We eventually agreed it was easier to be called just "Wet". with full details listed on the CG66 registration form

  • Haha 3

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1 hour ago, frangar said:

You obviously didn’t watch enough US trucking programmes....such as Movin on, BJ & the bear etc...I was only a small kid but I knew that. “Pete” means a Peterbuilt btw...a make of truck...I’m still a sad truck geek....

 

I remember watching "Cannonball"  as a young lad in the late 50's/early 60's, a series about a Canadian trucker and his mate.

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Athy said:

When I were a lad there was a joke alphabet  which went around. From memory it started:

A for 'orses

B for mutton

C for miles

D for dumb

F for vescence

etc.

This of course would not work nowadays, as so few modern people know what mutton is.

Z is for stripey 'os.

Dave Moore will understand this.

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2 hours ago, dor said:

When I was a student in the early '70s there was a song called "Convoy" (the film came from the song, not the other way round).  We were perplexed by some of the expressions, including "cab over Pete with a reefer on".  We had an American exchange student with us for a while who explained that "cab over Pete" meant the cab is over the engine (normal in Europe, but many American trucks had the engine under a big bonnet in front)  and "with a reefer on" meant it had a refrigeration unit fitted.

I remember Convoy - saw the film at the Regent Cinema in Marple, and at school we all knew the song ~(and the alternative "Convoy UK")

 

However, until now, I had no idea what "A cab over Pete with a reefer on" meant! You have enriched my trivia knowledge, although I can't honestly say that last 45 years have been barren and lost to the wilderness not knowing this.  :blink::wacko::lol:

Edited by magpie patrick

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Isis.  According to the Nicholson's guide, the river Thames upstream of where the River Thame flows in at Dorchester is called the River Isis.

 

So, it's the River Isis that runs through Abingdon and is navigable up to Lechworth     

 

 

Behold: the River Isis - and not a Kalashkinov or RPG in sight...

  

Screen Shot 2019-08-14 at 21.10.22.png

Edited by bagginz

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5 hours ago, sirweste said:

 

 

Off topic, the does anyone have a link for the end of the Stolen Boat thread? Was curious about it getting found, but hte various threads just petered out

Same question asked at Mercia but the answer was always 'under investigation so can't be discussed'. 

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17 hours ago, sueb said:

That was our boat and we were knackered when we finished it. You have the spelling wrong because we spelt it Nackered Navvy

Sorry???

I saw it a couple of times between Braunston and Napton a couple of months ago.

 

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On 12/08/2019 at 22:25, Ray T said:

Make haste slowly.

Or could be translated as “More haste less speed.”

AKA "It's the fastest way to slow down". Point of pedantry: It's Latin, so it doesn't need the accent. 

  • Greenie 1

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5 hours ago, Andrew Denny said:

AKA "It's the fastest way to slow down". Point of pedantry: It's Latin, so it doesn't need the accent. 

Oh. :captain:

Edited by Ray T

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It's hard not to get exasperated by all the combinations of ". . . Dreams" there seem to be.

 

Funnily enough, you never seem to see the wet variety.

 

Although the title is worst boat names, can't resist one of the best which used to be a tiny fibreglass cruiser on the Macclesfield; "Shy Tot".

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6 minutes ago, DRP said:

Although the title is worst boat names, can't resist one of the best which used to be a tiny fibreglass cruiser on the Macclesfield; "Shy Tot".

 

 

I've seen a couple of small boats around called "My Newt".

 

 

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