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New gas locker and oven


B2019
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39 minutes ago, B2019 said:

locker must be free of any:
• holes, e.g. caused by drilling,

 

39 minutes ago, B2019 said:

Cylinder locker bottoms, sides and seams covered by
this check must not rely upon glue or sealant to
prevent any leaked LPG from entering the interior of
the vessel.

So that is a no then.

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46 minutes ago, B2019 said:

Fit two bolts with rubber washers to secure the box and make sure no gas can enter the interior of the vessel. Is that compliant with the above?

It will depend on your surveyor (who may not even look at your gas locker)

 

By the 'letter of the law' drilling any holes below the gas cylinder valve would be a failure - but it depends how the examiner reads the rules.

 

Up to the level of the top of the cylinder valves, or
other high‐pressure components where these are
higher, the bottom, sides, and seams of every cylinder
locker must be free of any:
• holes, e.g. caused by drilling,...………….

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2 minutes ago, David Mack said:

There's a previous post on the forum somewhere where Rob at the BSS office confirmed that a hole through the gas locker which is filled by a bolt is acceptable. 

I would seal bolts with a suitable sealent rather than a rubber washer which might be combustible. 

I think once the gas locker is on fire, or the cabin, you want to be running away very fast.

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4 minutes ago, David Mack said:

There's a previous post on the forum somewhere where Rob at the BSS office confirmed that a hole through the gas locker which is filled by a bolt is acceptable. 

I would seal bolts with a suitable sealent rather than a rubber washer which might be combustible. 

Ok perfect. Thanks. If that is what Rob said I will listen to him.  

 

 

6 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

It will depend on your surveyor (who may not even look at your gas locker)

 

By the 'letter of the law' drilling any holes below the gas cylinder valve would be a failure - but it depends how the examiner reads the rules.

 

Up to the level of the top of the cylinder valves, or
other high‐pressure components where these are
higher, the bottom, sides, and seams of every cylinder
locker must be free of any:
• holes, e.g. caused by drilling,...………….

I see. So make sure the two drill holes are right up the top. 

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2 minutes ago, LadyG said:

I think once the gas locker is on fire, or the cabin, you want to be running away very fast.

I think you are not understanding the principle behind the BSSC

 

The gas must ONLY be able to 'leak' away overboard, not to be able to (potentially) leak thru a bolt-hole and onto the deck and (potentially) into the boat or bilges.

 

Any gas that is ignited will cause an explosion rather than a 'fire'.

 

A few years ago a Calor retailer about a mile (across several fields) away from us had an electrical fire which then caused the stock of gas cylinders to explode - the explosions actually rocked and rattled our roof.

Cylinders were shot several 100 feet into the air, as one came down it went thru the bed of a pick up truck - some shot off sideways, with one going in and out thru the backdoors of a car that was passing. It was a frightening experience. 

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1 hour ago, David Mack said:

There's a previous post on the forum somewhere where Rob at the BSS office confirmed that a hole through the gas locker which is filled by a bolt is acceptable. 

I would seal bolts with a suitable sealent rather than a rubber washer which might be combustible. 

Lets face it, you have to drill a hole and fit a bulkhead fitting to get the gas from the locker to the boat. I would suggest a nut, bolt and standard washer would give a more robust gas tight seal than the bulkhead fitting

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38 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

Lets face it, you have to drill a hole and fit a bulkhead fitting to get the gas from the locker to the boat. I would suggest a nut, bolt and standard washer would give a more robust gas tight seal than the bulkhead fitting

That fitting for the gas outlet should be above the height of the cylinders, which is acceptable. 

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When I was fitting out my boat, the surveyor, also a BSC & gassafe, overseeing my build and RCD, didn't like the way my regulator was not protected from a gas bottle being put in.  His suggestion was to make up a strap to protect the regulator and gas pipes, bolted at the top and bolted through the bottom of the gas locker.  He said that provided the bolt through the bottom was of the right size and could be easily checked for tightness, it would suffice.  Plenty of boats have bulkhead fittings to pass the gas pipe out of the locker which is a similar situation.

 

This was confirmed by Rob of the BSS Office (I keep a copy of his ruling in case of any BSS examiner trying to get a second examination).

 

And as the locker was only slightly larger than two 13Kg cylinders, it didn't need any additional means of restraining the gas cylinders.

The boat has since passed several BSS examinations without comment.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So the gas box is sorted and the oven is in my boat. Gas engineer is coming around to give me a quote today. Gas oven requires a whole new fit  Oven is around 1 metre away from gas box. What is the usual price to pay for a gas fit?

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2 minutes ago, B2019 said:

Gas fitter has quoted me £350 to fit gas oven. It's a whole new fit with idolater, regulator etc. Is this a good price?

 

Sounds about right to me. Did you check he is Gas Safe Registered WITH the extra qualification for LPG AND the extra qualification for BOATS? 

 

It will be written on the back of his ID card.

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Sounds about right to me. Did you check he is Gas Safe Registered WITH the extra qualification for LPG AND the extra qualification for BOATS? 

 

It will be written on the back of his ID card.

 

 

Says he is gas registered on Canal pages. But I get your point. I will ask to see ID card before he starts any work. 

 

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3 hours ago, B2019 said:

Says he is gas registered on Canal pages. But I get your point. I will ask to see ID card before he starts any work. 

 

 

Or you can check out his categories he is authorised to work on, on the Gas safe register site. 

 

 

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On 24/09/2019 at 17:11, Alan de Enfield said:

I think you are not understanding the principle behind the BSSC

 

The gas must ONLY be able to 'leak' away overboard, not to be able to (potentially) leak thru a bolt-hole and onto the deck and (potentially) into the boat or bilges.

 

Any gas that is ignited will cause an explosion rather than a 'fire'.

 

A few years ago a Calor retailer about a mile (across several fields) away from us had an electrical fire which then caused the stock of gas cylinders to explode - the explosions actually rocked and rattled our roof.

Cylinders were shot several 100 feet into the air, as one came down it went thru the bed of a pick up truck - some shot off sideways, with one going in and out thru the backdoors of a car that was passing. It was a frightening experience. 

No misunderstanding............... fire on boat, gas cylinders ............... rlf

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