Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

NEW: Following member feedback, we now have a Mooring & Marina Review forum. Post your review here.

tearoomtom

Are there any Rules

Featured Posts

We have travelled down from Northwich and are now at Blisworth. Can any body tell me the rules regarding mooring near bridges.

We have found that lots of boats seem to moor just before or just after bridges restricting the view and clear passage. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good etiquette says you don't moor near bridges. If you ever boat a full length boat towing a butty you will realise why it is advisable to leave room but as you say plenty moor as close as they can to a bridge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Rob-M said:

Good etiquette says you don't moor near bridges. If you ever boat a full length boat towing a butty you will realise why it is advisable to leave room but as you say plenty moor as close as they can to a bridge.

Not only do plenty moor as close as possible there are a number of permanent moorings which have been granted very close to bridges.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Restrict clear passage" or "block clear passage"? Unless a queue of boats has appeared, I'd say its the former - which seems to be tolerated, although I'd certainly not want a permanent mooring nearest the bridge, if there were a choice of others.

 

Common sense would say you leave enough of a gap so that you're unlikely to be hit by those, possibly with bigger boats or less experience (or both).

 

Bridge holes naturally restrict the view, especially on corners. Use your horn if needs be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Etiquette requires that you give a long blast on your horn as you pass the worst cases of mooring in a silly place (provided there are nearby alternatives and no good reason for doing so). :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if it classes as a rule but in "The Boaters Hanbook"  CRT say in their list of 14 places under the heading "Don't Moor" number 3 "Near any bridges" they also say (Number 😎 "By any blind spots".   I find bridges are often blind spots, so double reason for not mooring there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I suspect it's because there often a bit of piling near the bridge and the rest of the towpath is too soft to moor to. Sometimes it's one of those weird people who moor up for two weeks and then move a couple of miles need need car access. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/07/2019 at 10:53, system 4-50 said:

Etiquette requires that you give a long blast on your horn as you pass the worst cases of mooring in a silly place (provided there are nearby alternatives and no good reason for doing so). :)

I will collect some pictures or video footage including boat name and number.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/07/2019 at 12:37, ditchcrawler said:

Its so they don't have too far to walk to the car

You mean the rusty transit van.  I think every bridge on the K&A has a rusty transit squeezed into the verge, usually blue for some reason. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Neil2 said:

You mean the rusty transit van.  I think every bridge on the K&A has a rusty transit squeezed into the verge, usually blue for some reason. 

 

It's to match the tarpaulins on the boat.  Didn't you know?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

 

It's to match the tarpaulins on the boat.  Didn't you know?

Ah, good point.

 

Among my many Get Rich Quick schemes one was becoming a tarpaulin salesman on the K&A. 

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/07/2019 at 10:33, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

 

If you have a widebeam it the the only place you are allowed to moor. Other than bang opposite any other width restriction you can find. 

 

You'll notice this as you get around more. 

 

 

I really must disagree with you Mike, I never Moore near bridges, that makes it to easy for any scrotes to lob thing onto the boat, I also try to Moore away from bends and trees that over hang from the offside, lots of them on the GU, in fact miles of them from Knowle Locks right up to Camp Hill Locks, a lot of them more than half way across the canal, in some places even two narrow boats would have difficulty passing each other without one of them going into the trees and or running aground. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, F DRAYKE said:

I really must disagree with you Mike, I never Moore near bridges, that makes it to easy for any scrotes to lob thing onto the boat, I also try to Moore away from bends and trees that over hang from the offside, lots of them on the GU, in fact miles of them from Knowle Locks right up to Camp Hill Locks, a lot of them more than half way across the canal, in some places even two narrow boats would have difficulty passing each other without one of them going into the trees and or running aground. 

 

 

I had my tongue firmly in my cheek when typing that, you do realise???

 

If only there was a tongue-in-cheek smiley.....

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/07/2019 at 10:33, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

 

If you have a widebeam it the the only place you are allowed to moor. Other than bang opposite any other width restriction you can find. 

 

You'll notice this as you get around more. 

 

 

 

I've been about a bit and in fact what I've noticed is that the vast majority of boats moored inconsiderately are narrow boats.

2 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

 

I had my tongue firmly in my cheek when typing that, you do realise???

 

If only there was a tongue-in-cheek smiley.....

 

 

 

Yet lots of your posts seem to use the same sorts of anti-widebeam tongue in cheek rhetoric. The same joke told repeatedly tends to get a bit boring to the point one starts to think it's no longer really meant as a joke.

Edited by blackrose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

 

I had my tongue firmly in my cheek when typing that, you do realise???

 

If only there was a tongue-in-cheek smiley.....

 

 

Nah, the emoticon I want is a Vic and Bob "handbags" one, though I suspect only maybe 10% of the membership would understand it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, blackrose said:

 

I've been about a bit and in fact what I've noticed is that the vast majority of boats moored inconsiderately are narrow boats.

 

 

This is perhaps because the vast majority of boats on our canals are narrowboats: in other words a similar proportion of owners moor in difficult places, be their craft wide or narrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Athy said:

This is perhaps because the vast majority of boats on our canals are narrowboats: in other words a similar proportion of owners moor in difficult places, be their craft wide or narrow.

 

It is also because a narrow boat moored inconsiderately is less of an obstruction and less memorable than a widebeam moored equally inconsiderately. 

 

 

  • Greenie 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.