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Clodi

Induction Hobs & Crick Boats 2019

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Just had a quick look in the latest Waterways World mag & noticed in the article on Crick 'show boats' a couple feature induction hobs in the galley that 'run' off a 13amp 230volt plug. The favourite NB has a meaty looking electric system to look after things but I was wondering if anyone Knows how much juice an induction hob draws & are all induction hobs the same?.

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We have a portable induction hob at home purchased as a stop gap while waiting for a new cooker. Typically ~1 kW per "ring". They are brilliant, but not for a boat.

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Ours is a domestic induction hob. We have a 5.5 kVA Travelpower to run it. So we need the engine running to cook or to have shore power plugged in. As the largest ring is 3kW and the other three at least 1kW each I wouldn't dare turn them all up to max at once. In fact it's pretty unusual to use more than two rings at a time anyway. There's no connection between the hob and the batteries. We have a very small electric kettle for evening use. Each pot of tea sets us back at least 5% of capacity.

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Sometimes its cold in the morning, but not worth lighting the stove as that will make us too hot later, so put the kettle on the gas and put the Caframo fan behind it to blow a bit of heat into the saloon, works really, can't do that with an induction hob.

 

............Dave

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Also remember that what you take out of the batteries has to be replaced, even in winter so no solar power to help. There are several 1 ring and a few 2 ring induction hobs that use a standard 13 amp plug, but 2 kW for 20 minutes is 66 AmpHours, over half of my daily use.

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1 hour ago, Clodi said:

Just had a quick look in the latest Waterways World mag & noticed in the article on Crick 'show boats' a couple feature induction hobs in the galley that 'run' off a 13amp 230volt plug. The favourite NB has a meaty looking electric system to look after things but I was wondering if anyone Knows how much juice an induction hob draws & are all induction hobs the same?.

Its going to end in tears !!

 

Boat builders selling the 'Floating Flat with all amenities' concept, 'home from home but on the water' and 'your first step on the housing ladder' then a couple of days after taking delivery the new boater wonders why the lights have gone out.

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We are all electric , with inbuilt silenced generator and fairly big battery pack. Have been running large induction hob etc for the last 8 years. Generator comes on automatically to keep batteries topped up if not charging via the engine. 

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I must point out that no way am I considering an induction hob. I was just surprised to see see  them being fitted in 'top- notch' boats supposedly aimed at the cruising fraternity. I know a vast number of vessels never seem to leave the marina but even then would the shoreline be able to cope?

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3 minutes ago, Clodi said:

I must point out that no way am I considering an induction hob. I was just surprised to see see  them being fitted in 'top- notch' boats supposedly aimed at the cruising fraternity. I know a vast number of vessels never seem to leave the marina but even then would the shoreline be able to cope?

These ideas are pushed out there by people who when asked this simple question " How long have you lived on a boat ?" nearly always say :wacko: Oh I dont live on a boat I just sell boats designed for living aboard ? In other words they are mostly clueless.

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On 04/07/2019 at 17:15, Tuscan said:

We are all electric , with inbuilt silenced generator and fairly big battery pack. Have been running large induction hob etc for the last 8 years. Generator comes on automatically to keep batteries topped up if not charging via the engine. 

 

What happens if your battery voltage or state of charge falls below the generator cut in level after 8pm or in the middle of the night? Presumably there's some manual override that you switch off at night?

 

I know properly installed cocooned marine diesel generators are quiet but they're engines after all so they're not actually silent and running after 8pm is still verboten if you're moored near other boats.

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On 04/07/2019 at 15:33, Alan de Enfield said:

Its going to end in tears !!

 

Boat builders selling the 'Floating Flat with all amenities' concept, 'home from home but on the water' and 'your first step on the housing ladder' then a couple of days after taking delivery the new boater wonders why the lights have gone out.

A few years ago there was a review of an all-electric boat. They owner was a physics teacher who said something along the lines of “I’ve done all the calculations, I’ve got 330 amphours of batteries and a 90 amp alternator, so I know I can use about 300 AHrs and recharge them in under four hours “.

I did wonder how long his batteries lasted.

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12 minutes ago, dor said:

A few years ago there was a review of an all-electric boat. They owner was a physics teacher who said something along the lines of “I’ve done all the calculations, I’ve got 330 amphours of batteries and a 90 amp alternator, so I know I can use about 300 AHrs and recharge them in under four hours “.

I did wonder how long his batteries lasted.

There was an owner of an all-electric narrowboat who posted on the FB 12V electrics group words to the effect of “I’m having a gas locker built and chucking the oven and hob for gas. Yes, ok, all of you who said it wouldn’t work were right, ok?”

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36 minutes ago, WotEver said:

There was an owner of an all-electric narrowboat who posted on the FB 12V electrics group words to the effect of “I’m having a gas locker built and chucking the oven and hob for gas. Yes, ok, all of you who said it wouldn’t work were right, ok?”

I have known two fully electric boats with full time liveaboards on in the last thirty years, both were " Gas free " :rolleyes: . Both ended in tears.

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Encountered an 'all electric' boat in Market Harborough last year. The couple on board seemed quite happy with the setup. Don't remember the boats name. Often wondered how they've got on. 

I've got a diesel generator (Pagura 4 Kva) in a soundproofed cacoon which in turn is in a soundproofed locker. Very little engine noise but the water cooled exaust is fairly audible. Wouldn't want to run it after 8pm or even before on a balmy summers evening such as today.?

Edited by Slim
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Two Hoots, this year’s narrowboat Crick winner, has an induction hob with a lithium battery bank and a Beta 85hp (downrated to 65hp) engine to drive a mega alternator. Review in the latest WW.

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10 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

I have known two fully electric boats with full time liveaboards on in the last thirty years, both were " Gas free " :rolleyes: . Both ended in tears.

 

I'm not really sure what the advantages are of gas free boats, but since probably 99% of canal boats have lpg systems installed and we rarely hear about gas fires, explosions, etc, then I wouldn't have thought it was worth all the bother and expense of the heavily upgraded and complex electrical system required to cope with cooking.

 

Why would one want to use difficult to produce and store chemical energy from one's batteries for heating food in pots and pans or heating an oven, when there's a much better fuel that's widely available, easy to use and most British householders actually prefer to mains electric cooking because it's more controllable? It makes no sense to me. 

 

And as for induction hobs, nothing would induce me to put one on a boat.

Edited by blackrose
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1 hour ago, BruceinSanity said:

Two Hoots, this year’s narrowboat Crick winner, has an induction hob with a lithium battery bank and a Beta 85hp (downrated to 65hp) engine to drive a mega alternator. Review in the latest WW.

Very green and carbon neutral three sources of heat engine , alternator and cables and kettle to do one job, unless they have discovered 100% efficiency.

mean and green.

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2 hours ago, BruceinSanity said:

Two Hoots, this year’s narrowboat Crick winner, has an induction hob with a lithium battery bank and a Beta 85hp (downrated to 65hp) engine to drive a mega alternator. Review in the latest WW.

Interesting that the price is given as 'POA'.  I would imagine it is a bit frightening so not surprised they don't want to give it. 

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2 hours ago, blackrose said:

 

 

I'm not really sure what the advantages are of gas free boats, but since probably 99% of canal boats have lpg systems installed and we rarely hear about gas fires, explosions, etc, then I wouldn't have thought it was worth all the bother and expense of the heavily upgraded and complex electrical system required to cope with cooking.

 

Why would one want to use difficult to produce and store chemical energy from one's batteries for heating food in pots and pans or heating an oven, when there's a much better fuel that's widely available, easy to use and most British householders actually prefer to mains electric cooking because it's more controllable? It makes no sense to me. 

 

And as for induction hobs, nothing would induce me to put one on a boat.

 

Project Fear innit! ?

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29 minutes ago, cuthound said:

I'm not really sure what the advantages are of gas free boats,

I grew up in the fortunate position of having family owned moorings on the Great Ouse  spent my boyhood messing about on the water. Unfortunately one of my earliest memories was witnessing a fatal gas explosion on board a wooden broads-type cruiser. Since then I've owned & crewed many 'pleasure' craft  both inland & offshore, many with gas cooking/heating etc, however my current (probably last) boat is going to be gas-free. I'm installing a Heritage Uno to take care of heating & cooking supplemented by ' Hobbit' stove & a camping/caravan electric kettle ?

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4 hours ago, BruceinSanity said:

Two Hoots, this year’s narrowboat Crick winner, has an induction hob with a lithium battery bank and a Beta 85hp (downrated to 65hp) engine to drive a mega alternator. Review in the latest WW.

Two Hoots might have had all that but left on its maiden voyage to Manchester without a single windlass on board, the owners were told to stop at the first chandlery.......

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6 hours ago, BruceinSanity said:

Two Hoots, this year’s narrowboat Crick winner, has an induction hob with a lithium battery bank and a Beta 85hp (downrated to 65hp) engine to drive a mega alternator. Review in the latest WW.

No doubt they call it an ‘electric’ boat. But it isn’t. It’s a diesel boat. All of the power comes from burning oil. 

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