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tagulablue

Opening of apartments for the retired ....

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Those 'retirement' homes are dreadful. The adverts all show fit and active people having a wonderful time and for the first year or two that just might be the case but a few years down the line those same people are older, infirm, needing visits from every service you can think of and the place becomes a rabbit warren of housebound people behind closed doors, nobody uses the lounge and the place takes on that familiar smell...

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1 hour ago, Bee said:

Those 'retirement' homes are dreadful. The adverts all show fit and active people having a wonderful time and for the first year or two that just might be the case but a few years down the line those same people are older, infirm, needing visits from every service you can think of and the place becomes a rabbit warren of housebound people behind closed doors, nobody uses the lounge and the place takes on that familiar smell...

That is a bleak and not altogether accurate view.

 

We have been looking into these retirement flat schemes in North Wales lately for my father. Just ow he lives with us but it is getting more difficult to get away these days and leave him on his own.

 

Through the council, we can use some of these flats as respite care which is useful and we have visited some.  They are rather smart.  The way it works here is that the council supplies care and a housing association looks after the building and facilities.  A mid-day hot meal is provided as a communal facility but the residents manage their own breakfast and tea etc.  There are onsite care staff and depending on an individual assessment the care they provide is tailored to the person so some get more some less. Once a person needs more care than the facility can manage the person then needs to go to a full-time care or nursing  home

 

Old people care (and ost) presently though is an issue across the UK and because of an ageing population the pressure on facilities is going to get worse

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14 hours ago, tagulablue said:

 

Told daughter it looked very nice and tongue in cheek told her I was thinking of buying... blind panic on her part... no no no mum .. we will look after you... I am going to convert attic... but how will I get down from said attic... get down ??? She says .... no no we are not bothered about you getting down , we just don't want to waste our inheritance on a care home... xx

 

At least your daughter is honest. 😁

 

 

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2 hours ago, churchward said:

That is a bleak and not altogether accurate view.

 

We have been looking into these retirement flat schemes in North Wales lately for my father. Just ow he lives with us but it is getting more difficult to get away these days and leave him on his own.

 

Through the council, we can use some of these flats as respite care which is useful and we have visited some.  They are rather smart.  The way it works here is that the council supplies care and a housing association looks after the building and facilities.  A mid-day hot meal is provided as a communal facility but the residents manage their own breakfast and tea etc.  There are onsite care staff and depending on an individual assessment the care they provide is tailored to the person so some get more some less. Once a person needs more care than the facility can manage the person then needs to go to a full-time care or nursing  home

 

Old people care (and ost) presently though is an issue across the UK and because of an ageing population the pressure on facilities is going to get worse

We are getting more and more jobs at work to design apartments and housing schemes aimed at the retired and elderly. Developers are cottoning on that it is a growing sector of the housing market.

 

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5 hours ago, Bee said:

Those 'retirement' homes are dreadful. The adverts all show fit and active people having a wonderful time and for the first year or two that just might be the case but a few years down the line those same people are older, infirm, needing visits from every service you can think of and the place becomes a rabbit warren of housebound people behind closed doors, nobody uses the lounge and the place takes on that familiar smell...

My mother moved into a new retirement development about 4 years ago. At the time she was allocated the last available parking space, and later buyers had to wait until one became available. Now a number of residents have given up driving and half the spaces are unallocated.

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15 hours ago, tagulablue said:

Moored today on the Macclesfield visitor moorings... opposite what was last year a building site..... this year 62 brand new 'retirement' apartments... Honest Sir we did not know it was the official opening do when we lit a fire... they through open the double bi fold access to the beautiful Macclesfield canal doors to let the lady Mayoress out to cut the official ribbon just as our fire gave the first signs of life.. The more we panicked the worst it got but to be fair they carried on and I am sure the photos will look atmospheric!  Then we sat back to 'enjoy' party.... lady in blue cardy kept trying to escape and they seemed to keep pushing  her back into chair... 2 seconds she'd be up again ... then it became obvious ... she was not trying to escape ...she just wanted to get at the buffet and it wasn't 'officially' open yet.... Another new resident was already marked as the neighbour to avoid ... dressed in jumper and trainers he was helping himself to the champagne at an alarming rate ... eventually stood alone with one glass in each hand.... 

I couldn't find the purchase price of these things but he service fee was around 600 per month and when you finally departed this world they charged you for redecorating ... 

Told daughter it looked very nice and tongue in cheek told her I was thinking of buying... blind panic on her part... no no no mum .. we will look after you... I am going to convert attic... but how will I get down from said attic... get down ??? She says .... no no we are not bothered about you getting down , we just don't want to waste our inheritance on a care home... xx

Well, if it’s avoiding care home fees you want I can help..... its what I do!

If you’re thinking of buying one of these retirement homes please read the small print as the developers frequently take a chunk of  the fee when you come to sell it. 

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19 minutes ago, Dyertribe said:

Well, if it’s avoiding care home fees you want I can help..... its what I do!

If you’re thinking of buying one of these retirement homes please read the small print as the developers frequently take a chunk of  the fee when you come to sell it. 

and the management company may have to approve anyone you want to sell to.

Edited by Tony Brooks

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2 hours ago, Naughty Cal said:

We are getting more and more jobs at work to design apartments and housing schemes aimed at the retired and elderly. Developers are cottoning on that it is a growing sector of the housing market.

 

I can believe it. All the Council/Housing association apartment places we looked at in our county in North Wales have been built in the last 5 or so years.

 

I do worry about the affordability for some people of these facilities and it seems very different circumstances in different places around the country.

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Not a purchase of a retirement home but we have a friend who is renting in a development run by Anchor homes and it is lovely, no smell at all.

You have to be 55+ and debt free but they are not expensive.

 

Still, you will never get me into one...............................

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27 minutes ago, hider said:

Not a purchase of a retirement home but we have a friend who is renting in a development run by Anchor homes and it is lovely, no smell at all.

You have to be 55+ and debt free but they are not expensive.

 

Still, you will never get me into one...............................

You must be a bit young to be thinking about retirement homes unless you're planning on putting Sam in one.

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8 hours ago, Murflynn said:

what a shallow view.      your glass is obviously half empty.

 

...............  and which homes are you referring to exactly when you refer to 'those "retirement" homes' ?   Do you imagine they are all the same?

 

I bought a sheltered flat for my Mum in Otley, where she lived for about 8 years.  Self-sufficient, wonderful BUPA manger on site, a few voluntary social events.  She became infirm during the last year, but needed no visits apart from the cleaner she had employed from day one.  There was a wonderful neighbourly atmosphere with everyone looking out for each other.  She moved into a care home at the age of 97, having spent a very happy and relaxed time in the flat after my Dad had passed on.

Its a sad but typical post from our forum member. On a certain long running thread he whines all the time about or wonderful country and indeed with others his glass is actualy not even half full!!  Sad really. I am looking at places for my mum at present for when she gets older ( she is 98 and a half at present ) I doubt she will move into one but many of the places are amazing. Times have changed over the past few years.

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what a strange and unappealing post from Mrs Melly. ....................  unsurprisingly you are the one who comes across as sad.

 

are you on beetle juice or what?

 

PS: what is this 'long running thread' that you refer to?  It has passed me by completely.

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9 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

Its a sad but typical post from our forum member. On a certain long running thread he whines all the time about or wonderful country and indeed with others his glass is actualy not even half full!!  Sad really. I am looking at places for my mum at present for when she gets older ( she is 98 and a half at present ) I doubt she will move into one but many of the places are amazing. Times have changed over the past few years.

Indeed they have.

 

We have friends who are in a similar situation to yours. Father in his 90's who can not cope at home anymore. Moved in with them only now it is too difficult for them all, so father is going into "a home"

 

He had images of what some expect retirement housing to be and was adamant it was not for him. However they have found him a lovely apartment in a complex that he is loving. He gets to see and interact wit more people of his own age and gets the level of support that he needs. Care is tailored to each resident.

 

It has given him a new lease of life and given his children some space to live their own lives again whilst still seeing their father.

1 minute ago, Murflynn said:

what a strange and unappealing post from Mrs Melly. ....................  unsurprisingly you are the one who comes across as sad.

 

are you on beetle juice or what?

 

PS: what is this 'long running thread' that you refer to?  It has passed me by completely.

I imagine it is the one that has gone through several hundred pages already!

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45 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

 

I imagine it is the one that has gone through several hundred pages already!

:huh:          not aware of having contributed to whatever it is.   I usually avoid such threads like the plague.

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24 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

:huh:          not aware of having contributed to whatever it is.   I usually avoid such threads like the plague.

I don't know for certain but I suspect that MrSmelly meant to quote Bee and not yourself, as Bee is a long time poster on the "worlds longest thread" and he gave you a greenie for your reply to Bee. 

 

ETA he was replying to you but was talking about Bee. 

 

 

Edited by Tumshie

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2 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

I don't know for certain but I suspect that MrSmelly meant to quote Bee and not yourself, as Bee is a long time poster on the "worlds longest thread" and he gave you a greenie for your reply to Bee. 

 

 

Indeed, and quite correct. I was not quoting Muflynn who is not a glass half empty type :cheers:

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1 hour ago, Naughty Cal said:

Indeed they have.

 

We have friends who are in a similar situation to yours. Father in his 90's who can not cope at home anymore. Moved in with them only now it is too difficult for them all, so father is going into "a home"

 

He had images of what some expect retirement housing to be and was adamant it was not for him. However they have found him a lovely apartment in a complex that he is loving. He gets to see and interact wit more people of his own age and gets the level of support that he needs. Care is tailored to each resident.

 

It has given him a new lease of life and given his children some space to live their own lives again whilst still seeing their father.

I imagine it is the one that has gone through several hundred pages already!

Indeedy. We are still lucky in that mum is living in her own house without carers. She is exceptional in that respect for a human nearly 100 years old. However my sister and a lady friend visit nearly every day and my wife and I now from this summer go and stay for a couple or three nights every couple of weeks. She isnt what she was however so all options are open. She in fact would love us to move in with her which we will if she needs care that we can deliver otherwise we are looking at other options. Moving in to her lovely detached cottage in a north Yorks village would be a prefered move for many but we live on a boat by choice and dread having to move back into ANY house. We could sell her house and buy or should I say she could sell her house and buy a great assisted living place but she wants to remain in the house she bought with my old dad in 1953 which I suppose is understood. I dont want the house in the end so rather it went on her care some way that best for her.

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Whats this? somebody mentioned my name? Oh I might have known. Glass half empty indeed. I must admit the last few days have been a bit grim with the rain chucking it down and me with a load of gardening to do but hey ho. Retirement homes though, My mother bought a flat from McCarthy and Stone in a brand new development and over a few years as everybody aged it did turn into a fairly grim and lonely place, the residents seldom sell and move on somewhere else, they just stay till they die so the home does turn into something else. Can't remember the service charge figures but they were high and always rising and when we came to sell the owners took a slice as well. A lot depends on the 'Warden' Her job is to look after the building - not the residents - and if he / she does not feel like it then he / she will do nowt - and the residents pay the wardens wages and rent on the flat as well as all the costs on the rest of the building.  Anyway, just be careful of the small print. Meanwhile I shall whistle a merry tune and hop and skip into a bright and hopeful day, might drop into see that Mr. Smelly and cheer him up.

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1 hour ago, mrsmelly said:

Indeed, and quite correct. I was not quoting Muflynn who is not a glass half empty type :cheers:

apology gracefully accepted :cheers:

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