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Derek Porteous

Traditional Boats... a sense of entitlement?

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On 11/06/2019 at 17:53, dor said:

A few years ago I was waiting to go down at Maureen's lock (Wardle lock) in Middlewich.  It was quite busy with a few boats waiting to go up.  A "working" boat turned up and the crew put the boat straight into the Middlewich Branch under the bridge, just below the lock.

As one of them came up all smiling and swinging his windlass, complete with waistcoat and neckerchief, Maureen told him in no uncertain terms to get to the back of the queue and don't ever try and pull that "working boat" stunt again.  Crew went back sheepishly to the boat and it backed out to wait its turn.

Lovely to watch!

The canal needs more Maureens.  We still miss her. If anybody knew about working boats it was Maureen.

 

 

14dlzme.jpg

Edited by catweasel
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1 minute ago, catweasel said:

The canal needs more Maureens.  We still miss her. If anybody knew about working boats it was Maureen.

We came though Maureen's lock on one occasion behind a boat full of what looked like rugby players. One of the chaps was struggling to lift the bottom gate paddle so Maureen walked over and whipped it up with ease. She then turned to him in front of his mates and just said "Have you not had your Weetabix this morning?" and asked back to her front door. As you can imagine all his mates just fell about laughing.

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On 14/06/2019 at 12:42, MoominPapa said:

The rudest person I've ever met on the cut was in charge of an unconverted historic boat. He was even ruder than the second rudest person I ever met on the cut, who had a clonecraft.

 

MP.

 

 

The rudest person I have ever met on the cut, and possibly in my life, was operating an historic horse drawn boat a few years ago. A truly awful person. A lady in a moored pleasure boat on the Coventry was a close second.
Other than the horse boat, I have always got along with owners of historic/working craft. 

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4 hours ago, furnessvale said:

I thought Allchins were 1.5" so there you go, there's always someone to look down on.

 

Anyone got a Mamod? 🙂

 

George

Aye I've still got my Mamod traction engine that I got when I was 10. Rebuilt it completely a few years ago for its 50th birthday in fact. Still goes well at 54 years old.

 

 

12794516_10204190414199712_2281436574021323381_n.jpg

Edited by catweasel
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1 hour ago, catweasel said:

Aye I've still got my Mamod traction engine that I got when I was 10. Rebuilt it completely a few years ago for its 50th birthday in fact. Still goes well at 54 years old.

 

 

12794516_10204190414199712_2281436574021323381_n.jpg

Thats an old one, reverse lever a brass tap and the burn your fingers whistle. None of the 1970 heath and safety insulated stuff. I stripped one of mine to bare as well

nice. I must not not rebuild my collection that I sold in oz.

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34 minutes ago, roland elsdon said:

Thats an old one, reverse lever a brass tap and the burn your fingers whistle. None of the 1970 heath and safety insulated stuff. I stripped one of mine to bare as well

nice. I must not not rebuild my collection that I sold in oz.

Bought new on 21st February 1966. One careful owner, never raced or rallied. ;)

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13 hours ago, Rob-M said:

We came though Maureen's lock on one occasion behind a boat full of what looked like rugby players. One of the chaps was struggling to lift the bottom gate paddle so Maureen walked over and whipped it up with ease. She then turned to him in front of his mates and just said "Have you not had your Weetabix this morning?" and asked back to her front door. As you can imagine all his mates just fell about laughing.

That is an old trick, and I'm not above (below?) Playing it on occasion!

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22 minutes ago, Mike Todd said:

That is an old trick, and I'm not above (below?) Playing it on occasion!

Is it a trick? And somehow I can’t imagine it would have the same impact when you do it.

 

JP

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1 hour ago, Mike Todd said:

That is an old trick, and I'm not above (below?) Playing it on occasion!

Not quite sure what you mean. The chap couldn't raise the paddle but with her years of boating experience the ageing Maureen whipped it up showing it isn't about brute force but having the correct technique.

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A lock-keeper told me that the secret is to put your windlass on the spindle and give it a feeble tug.  This lulls the paddle into thinking that you are not serious.  Then take it by surprise and yank it up.

Try it - it works!

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8 hours ago, Rob-M said:

Not quite sure what you mean. The chap couldn't raise the paddle but with her years of boating experience the ageing Maureen whipped it up showing it isn't about brute force but having the correct technique.

Surely it must have happened to most boaters before long. You try to lift a difficult paddle and manage but a turn or two. As you draw breath, someone else comes along, "Let me do it for you" at which point the paddle lifts quite easily. Of course, what has happened is that the first turn or so drops the level the quickest and by the time the takeover has happened, some of the pressure on the paddle has been diminished, making it much easier to move.

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11 minutes ago, Mike Todd said:

Surely it must have happened to most boaters before long. You try to lift a difficult paddle and manage but a turn or two. As you draw breath, someone else comes along, "Let me do it for you" at which point the paddle lifts quite easily. Of course, what has happened is that the first turn or so drops the level the quickest and by the time the takeover has happened, some of the pressure on the paddle has been diminished, making it much easier to move.

A friend helped me for a fortnight on the Leeds Liverpool. I caught him out by doing this on countless locks. He never twigged. And I never told him. 

 

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5 hours ago, Chris Williams said:

A lock-keeper told me that the secret is to put your windlass on the spindle and give it a feeble tug.  This lulls the paddle into thinking that you are not serious.  Then take it by surprise and yank it up.

Try it - it works!

:clapping:

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On 12/06/2019 at 10:40, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Actually, I've had that happen to me too. I challenged them and they came up with a feeble-sounding justification, something to do with long-lining IIRC.

 

But the deed was done and the lock refilling while I was arguing about it. Can any of the historic boaters here offer a reasonable explanation for this behaviour? 

 

 

Long-lining (proper) is only used on flights, where the line goes between locks. What was probably meant is that they were using a long line to tow the butty into the lock from the motor. If so it's possible to drop the line and let another boat through, but it then involves moving the motor boat out of the way, getting the other boat in, and then reversing the motor back into the lock mouth. By the time this has happened you could have got the butty through anyway.

 

On 13/06/2019 at 19:54, Jim Batty said:

We also accompanied a real, loaded, working boat through half a dozen locks on the GUC traveling north from Apsley ... whose skipper insisted we leave every set of top gates open as we proceeded. This finally irked us enough to resort to stopping for 'an early dinner' ... and let him continue on his own. And he was off with a snort! 

They would know (hopefully) which locks leaked, or which sections were river fed. Anything lower than Sewer Lock usually has plenty of water, though I try and shut the locks that only go up to a non-fed section.

On 15/06/2019 at 18:01, alan_fincher said:

If this were true, surely they would all leak to empty if left full.


Quite a few left emptyand with all gates shut will self-fill quite quickly.

So unless you know which is which, on an individual lock basis, surely it is best to close everything?

In a perfect world, with all gates shut, all locks should fill, as the top weir on these locks is set into the ground paddles, and then into the locks. However where the bottom gates leak badly this doesn't happen. There are a couple of examples where locks do leak so badly at the top (and this needs more local knowledge than most have) so it's not possible to assume bottom gates can always be left open.

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