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3 hours ago, rusty69 said:

I spose they have lots of scotch in Bedford.

Oh yeah, Bedford.... I forgot I was in Bedford 

 

:huh: Errr.... um..... yes I brought it with me, but don't tell any one cos I may not have paid duty as I crossed the border. :blush:

 

It always sounds really peculiar when people call it scotch. :unsure:

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16 hours ago, Tumshie said:

The Lighthouse ?

lol it just means, "Big Island" a common phrase if you live on the west coast of scotland.

 It was the one where there was a murder, maybe. 

 

 

Dubh Artach was a Thomas Stevenson., a classic ......

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18 minutes ago, WotEver said:

Completely agree :)

 

I was very young but it was the first example I ever noticed in life of how better marketing of an inferior product fools the average consumer.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

I was very young but it was the first example I ever noticed in life of how better marketing of an inferior product fools the average consumer.

 

 

Bubblegum with cartoons?

sort of KinderEggs for the masses.................

NB, MtB was born mature, just as Boater Sam was born Mr Grumpy.

Edited by LadyG
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11 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

I was very young but it was the first example I ever noticed in life of how better marketing of an inferior product fools the average consumer.

Good point that. A bit like RedyBrek. 

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16 minutes ago, LadyG said:

lol it just means, "Big Island" a common phrase if you live on the west coast of scotland.

I was trying to work out which Eilean Mòr you meant, for me the first Eilean Mòr that springs to mind is the one of the Outer Hebrides, which is why I mentioned the lighthouse, but I've just realised that you being a bit down the coast probbly meant the one in the Argyll and Bute area. 

Edited by Tumshie

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Just now, WotEver said:

Good point that. A bit like RedyBrek. 

 

Ah yes, "central heating for kids" was their telly advert slogan... with kids in the advert surrounded by a red glowing halo.

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Ah yes, "central heating for kids" was their telly advert slogan... with kids in the advert surrounded by a red glowing halo.

 

???

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9 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

Ah yes, "central heating for kids" was their telly advert slogan... with kids in the advert surrounded by a red glowing halo.

Well, it was the middle of the Cold War when we all expected to be irradiated ;)

 

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11 minutes ago, WotEver said:

Well, it was the middle of the Cold War when we all expected to be irradiated ;)

 

 

Yes this is why that sketch was so funny. Youngsters nowadays don't realise how we all lived in mild fear of nuclear war at any minute, back then. 

 

The advert was slightly poorly judged for exactly that reason, and the Not the Nine O'Clock News sketch ripped the p!ss out of it mercilessly. 

 

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2 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Yes this is why that sketch was so funny. Youngsters nowadays don't realise how we all lived in mild fear of nuclear war at any minute, back then. 

I never lived in fear of nuclear war, I spent my whole childhood wondering what all the fuss was about - I was obviously a very naïve child. 

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5 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

I never lived in fear of nuclear war, I spent my whole childhood wondering what all the fuss was about - I was obviously a very naïve child. 

 

As skoolchildren and teenagers we lived in the constant knowledge that we could all be dead in four minutes, should a nuclear war between USA and USSR actually start, which seemed highly likely at times.  It was a very strange feeling. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four-minute_warning

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuban_Missile_Crisis

 

 

 

Edited by Mike the Boilerman

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4 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

As skoolchildren and teenagers we lived in the constant knowledge that we could all be dead in four minutes, should a nuclear war between USA and USSR actually start. It was a very strange feeling. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four-minute_warning

 

Oh I knew about all that, you couldn't miss it - I just never believed it would happen. Denial is a wonderful thing. :D

 

The Cuban Missile Crisis was long before my time and if asked about it when I was little I probbly would have shrugged and said it didn't come to much, did it. :o

Edited by Tumshie

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11 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

That's IT!!

 

Fantastic stuff. Angel Delight a pale and feeble imitation.....

 

 

Nah ……..The 'bestest' was Blancmange made with evaporated milk - served as a desert after condensed milk sandwiches on white bread.

 

Those were the days ………..

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23 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

I never lived in fear of nuclear war, I spent my whole childhood wondering what all the fuss was about - I was obviously a very naïve child. 

............. and did you ever get  over that?

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1 minute ago, LadyG said:

............. and did you ever get  over that?

? No I don't think so. Still just as naïve just a bit taller with it. 

 

:giggles:

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1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Nah ……..The 'bestest' was Blancmange made with evaporated milk - served as a desert after condensed milk sandwiches on white bread.

 

Those were the days ………..

One of the best ways to eat condensed milk it Tablet. ?

iu.jpeg

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2 hours ago, WotEver said:

Good point that. A bit like RedyBrek. 

Readybrek, you mean PoPTarts?

24 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

One of the best ways to eat condensed milk it Tablet. ?

iu.jpeg

5 Condensed milk in tubes will keep you warm and comfy in a snowhole, on the tops, DAMHIK

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3 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Yes please.

 

Does it involve bikes?

 

 

Q. How many ears does Mr Spock have? 

 

 

A. Three.. One on the left, one on the right.......... and the final front ear. 

 

 

Queue canned laughter. 

Jeez, I'm getting as bad as Dr Bob and his fish jokes. 

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12 minutes ago, rusty69 said:

Q. How many ears does Mr Spock have? 

 

 

A. Three.. One on the left, one on the right.......... and the final front ear. 

 

 

Queue canned laughter. 

Jeez, I'm getting as bad as Dr Bob and his fish jokes. 

 

iu.jpeg

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24 minutes ago, rusty69 said:

Q. How many ears does Mr Spock have? 

A. Three.. One on the left, one on the right.......... and the final front ear. 

Queue canned laughter. 

Jeez, I'm getting as bad as Dr Bob and his fish jokes. 

 

iu.jpeg

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4 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

As skoolchildren and teenagers we lived in the constant knowledge that we could all be dead in four minutes, should a nuclear war between USA and USSR actually start, which seemed highly likely at times.  It was a very strange feeling. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four-minute_warning

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuban_Missile_Crisis

 

 

 

you surprise me.    I was not aware of any particular concern about nuclear war during the 60's.  When I went to army cadet camp in the early 60's we were shown the government information film about nuclear blasts and it seemed utterly unreal and fantasy stuff.   None of us cadets were worried in the least, and our parents and teachers weren't either.  I was 17 when the Cuban business was ongoing.

 

in 1975 I met a long-lost cousin who was flying a fully loaded Vulcan out of Malta as part of our deterrent programme.  He was very matter of fact and didn't believe it would ever happen.  If it had happened he would have been in a strange situation where the Vulcan crew could have survived but would have nowhere safe to land and no-one on the ground to communicate with.  

Edited by Murflynn

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1 minute ago, Murflynn said:

you surprise me.    I was not aware of any particular concern about nuclear war during the 60's.  When I went to army cadet camp in the early 60's we were shown the government information film about nuclear blasts and it seemed utterly unreal and fantasy stuff.   None of us cadets were worried in the least, and our parents and teachers weren't either.  I was 17 when the Cuban business was ongoing.

 

I can remember sitting in front of the telly during the Cuban missile crisis and my parents telling me there was going to be a nuclear war if Krushchev or someone said "NO" to something or other, waiting for a newsflash of the result of the negotiations. The newsflash came up and the answer was NO and I was terrified. The I realised I could do nothing about it so went outside to play on my bike. We were all very conscious of the four minute warning thing, with skool teaching us to hide under the desk and such rubbish when the warning came, which I recognised as stupidity even as a child. 

 

This may have been because we had a left wing council and edumacation authority. 

 

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In the 60s we were getting lectures at school from the 'Civil Defence' , all about what to do if we heard the 4 minute warning - I remember 'if you are caught out in the open, lie in a ditch and the blast will pass over you, if at home, take a door of its hinges and prop it up on an inside brick wall, and shelter behind it, or, make a 'bunker under the stairs' I don't think they really had much idea about what an A-Bomb did.

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1 hour ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

I can remember sitting in front of the telly during the Cuban missile crisis and my parents telling me there was going to be a nuclear war if Krushchev or someone said "NO" to something or other, waiting for a newsflash of the result of the negotiations. The newsflash came up and the answer was NO and I was terrified. The I realised I could do nothing about it so went outside to play on my bike. We were all very conscious of the four minute warning thing, with skool teaching us to hide under the desk and such rubbish when the warning came, which I recognised as stupidity even as a child. 

 

This may have been because we had a left wing council and edumacation authority. 

 

I lived in Berk Shire at the time and the authorities clearly thought all us berks were dispensable, especially the ones wearing slightly flared (as much as we could get away with) trousers and Chelsea boots to skule.  Some of us wore parka jackets over our uniforms, which were definitely out of order but acceptable given the coldest winter (62/63) I can remember (in the UK at least).  Long live the Mods. 

 

We certainly had no training or advice about hiding under desks or in ditches.  Perhaps us berks at Reading School were just too snooty to listen, so the teachers didn't bother.

1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

In the 60s we were getting lectures at school from the 'Civil Defence' , all about what to do if we heard the 4 minute warning - I remember 'if you are caught out in the open, lie in a ditch and the blast will pass over you, if at home, take a door of its hinges and prop it up on an inside brick wall, and shelter behind it, or, make a 'bunker under the stairs' I don't think they really had much idea about what an A-Bomb did.

nobody even told us what a 4 minute warning would sound or look like.   Didn't do us any harm and we avoided the terrible stress that was obviously experienced by the likings of MtB. ........................  probably scarred him for life.  :rolleyes:

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