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Paint colour query


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We are having the boat painted in a couple of months time and we are struggling to find the paint colour we want. 

Already spent out on tins to test but so far have not found the right one yet. 

On the cover of this months Tillergraph is a boat with a purple/blue colour which we like. Anyone know what colour it is? 

15549658548303549921577066550686.jpg

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That is Oxford Blue on Yum Sing, though it appears somewhat brighter in the image you posted. It was last repainted at Norton Canes Boatbuilders a couple of years ago, I did the lettering. You may find the actual Oxford a tad dark, though I quite like it. Would a colour chart from paint suppliers such as Craftmaster, International or Symphony paints be less expensive than buying samples?

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I concur with Dave. My boat is also Oxford blue and whilst doing paint repairs I have found that there are actually several shades of Oxford Blue, with quite a bit of difference.

The Symphony one is quite bright, like the one in the photo, whilst the Rylards version is much darker. I think the international is also dark, but maybe not as dark as Rylards. Have not tried the Craftmaster yet.

 

Note that Craftmaster also do a Midnight Blue which is maybe a bit darker than Oxford blue but also has a distinctly purple hue to it.

 

...........Dave

 

 

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Dave,

 

Thanks for the reply really appreciate it. 

 

We have numerous colour charts but found that how they look on the chart/swatch and when you have it on a larger area quite different - normally we find they look darker. 

 

I have a large board that I have put trails on which has helped. 

 

Just do not want to get the boat painted and then see it afterwards as and not be happy. 

 

Martin

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You are correct, I find it almost impossible to make a decision based on a little sample, so the big board is a really good idea. Oxford blue looks much darker as it ages and loses its shine so trying to think what the boat might look like in a few years time is yet another factor.

 

Oxford Blue is quite common and a safe choice, I have never seen one that looks totally wrong,but it may well end up looking a bit darker than your photo.

 

............Dave

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Midnight blue is a bugger to cover well in all of the brands painters I work with use, I don’t know why.

From the photo, the “ white” is actually pale ivory, a Norton Canes standard, the bow blue French blue and chrome yellow, more standards and the red, I think, is Bright Red, though I can’t be certain..... I only turn up when all of the main painting is complete.

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Just now, Machpoint005 said:

Our boat is Oxford blue. Before the paint job I was warned that choosing too dark a blue will result in a purple boat in a few years. So far (6 years) we've got away with it, but then, ours is not all that dark.

I can’t see why that would be the case. Red is the fastest colour to fade (witness the number of pink boats and the colours in a faded photograph), so I would expect the blue to become if anything a little deeper over time. 

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16 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

ie a little bit purpler! Looked at any rainbows lately?

Rainbows (basically ‘light’) are additive, paint is subtractive.

 

Purple paint is achieved by adding red to blue. Purple light is achieved by removing red from blue, which is why it’s at the opposite side of the rainbow. 

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1 hour ago, WotEver said:

Rainbows (basically ‘light’) are additive, paint is subtractive.

 

Purple paint is achieved by adding red to blue. Purple light is achieved by removing red from blue, which is why it’s at the opposite side of the rainbow. 

 

Yes,  I know -- but none of that is relevant when UV is affecting the pigments.

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Its so difficult to judge from photos. Our boat is Rylards Oxford blue and is much much darker than Hilde. Are you saying No121 is midnight blue? I really like that shade, but the Midnight Blue boat that I have seen "live" was a bit too purple for my taste.

 

.............Dave

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I’d be wary of making colour judgements from any screen representations , I’ve found wide variations from the actual shade itself. Samples are best viewed of the dry colour in natural light, for me. UV damage caused all colours to fade, some more quickly than others,,reds especially, though one of my opinions is that a bit of red, at least, is needed on a boat.....

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2 hours ago, WotEver said:

I refer the honourable gentleman back to post #8 :)

 

Perhaps blue and red pigments both fade at similar rates, but when the main colour is pure red (whatever that means!) it's just that it is more noticeable? There must be some reason why dark blue turns purple after years of UV exposure. Taking away some red wouldn't do it.

 

 

Edited by Machpoint005
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42 minutes ago, dave moore said:

I’d be wary of making colour judgements from any screen representations , I’ve found wide variations from the actual shade itself. Samples are best viewed of the dry colour in natural light, for me. UV damage caused all colours to fade, some more quickly than others,,reds especially, though one of my opinions is that a bit of red, at least, is needed on a boat.....

 

Half a top plank each side, a handful of diamonds on the centre board of the cratch, and the lower tunnel band - that's it. None of them has faded noticeably on my boat though. Colour schemes and decoration are very much a matter of personal taste -- we went for the 'less is more' approach of Oxford blue all over, and off-white lines, full stop ... then the signwriter put his oar in!

 

Agree about the colour judgements on screen though - no two computers are alike!

 

image.jpeg.b83d85b942dd60d5ba146a405e539f30.jpeg

Edited by Machpoint005
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19 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Perhaps blue and red pigments both fade at similar rates, but when the main colour is pure red (whatever that means!) it's just that it is more noticeable? There must be some reason why dark blue turns purple after years of UV exposure. Taking away some red wouldn't do it.

You’re right. You’d need to add red. Or have the blue fade faster, which it generally doesn’t appear to do. Odd, innit?

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16 minutes ago, David Mack said:

 

I use my laptop with an external monitor alongside. Some colours look very different on the two screens.

I work in TV & film and have taken every effort to grade the various screens. We have one reference monitor which is correct but for TV work we also have a couple of domestic TVs hanging on the output. That’s in addition to any PC screens which may also be showing the image. New clients always ask “Which colour will it be when it’s transmitted?” To which the answer is “It’ll be transmitted the same as this reference monitor but what it looks like at home entirely depends on the viewer’s TV”. Some clients get it, some think I’m trying to pull the wool over their eyes. The gamma curve for monitors and other screens varies hugely. 

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6 hours ago, David Mack said:

 

I use my laptop with an external monitor alongside. Some colours look very different on the two screens.

Calibrating monitors and printers is a black art!! Sometimes its almost impossible to acheive. I tried on several occasions to calibrate HP laser printers and failed miserably - all prints had a slight tendency to green, the alternative was a pink tendency and horrible greens!!! Asfor monitors my employers would not pay for top end ones which could be properly calibrated.

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All,

 

Thanks all for the feedback. We will continue in our quest to come up with a scheme but I think we are getting closer now. 

 

Our boat is 12 years old and the finish is looking a little tired, especially the red bits, and rather than just repeat what is already there we have decided to 'up level'. We concur with the 'less is more' approach and the sign writing can make all the difference. If you have a boat on traditional lines that is different. 

 

The painter we are using likes international paints. They do a number of RAL colours and I found a website that gives the RGB values for the RAL number. This is useful to see the amount of each colour in the number although I realise this is not how the paint is mixed and looking at it on a screen is going to not give a definitive representation. So it might have to be another 1 litre tin to paint the hardboard test board. Not sure what to do with all the rejected tins of colours with only a small amount used from them....... 

Martin

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