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Got a cubic metre cut and split drying out. Assuming well seasoned would you use it in wood stove?

 

My thinking is to throw in the odd log on a hardwood fire.

 

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I've been working my way through a small mountain of it after I took down 5 of the monsters. It sat for at least two, nearly three years before I started to burn it, I don't burn huge amounts at any one time, and I mix it with other stuff but I've had no problem with it. 

 

 

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36 minutes ago, mark99 said:

Got a cubic metre cut and split drying out. Assuming well seasoned would you use it in wood stove?

 

My thinking is to throw in the odd log on a hardwood fire.

 

Yes but as you suggest season well mix with other timber and maybe don't use it as a slumber/slow burn fuel.

 

Oh and I assume it's not an open fire because that would be exciting 

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6 minutes ago, mark99 said:

It's a truly horrible tree. 

Many years ago I saw the original on the estate where it was discovered and it was a very striking tree, almost magnificent in its way

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28 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

Many years ago I saw the original on the estate where it was discovered and it was a very striking tree, almost magnificent in its way

Quote from someone. They should have a warning label on. "We never stop getting bigger". Ok with most trees but they just dominate and bring dark green gloom.  ;)

Edited by mark99

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The one draw back from when I took mine down they were all full of birds nests. I hasten to add they were all empty by the time I cut the trees down but the birds would have come back to use them again the next year and I felt really bad about that. The trees had become so neglected by the time I moved into my house that the were causing a great deal of damage, I had to dig up paths and drive to get the roots up so I could relay everything safely, and there were walls that were going to get it next, so I really had no choice but to take them down, but I really did feel bad for the birdies.

 

I also really really hate the damn things. 

Edited by Tumshie

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11 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

The one draw back from when I took mine down they were all full of birds nests. I hasten to add they were all empty by the time I cut the trees down but the birds would have come back to use them again the next year and I felt really bad about that. The trees had become so neglected by the time I moved into my house that the were causing a great deal of damage, I had to dig up paths and drive to get the roots up so I could relay everything safely, and there were walls that were going to get it next, so I really had no choice but to take them down, but I really did feel bad for the birdies.

 

I also really really hate the damn things. 

They aren't in my top 10 but they are much maligned, birds love to nest in them, properly maintained they make really good hedges and in the right location they are striking plus they made me quite a lot of cash over the years removing them :)

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I dug up and burned 10 of the bloody things a few years ago on the squirrel.

 

Another 20  to go and I will be a happy chappy. 

 

 

 

Edited by rusty69

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2 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

right location they are striking

Yes the location makes all the difference - people often buy them at a foot tall not realising they will grow to be 30 - 40 feet high. They look really cute when they're tiny and planted either side of a gate or door. In a big open area of a country estate they are rather stunning - but they are incredibly hungry for attention. I think one of the reasons they are so maligned is because they often tend to be inherited when you buy a house where you try to wrangle them for a few years before you realise it's actually really hard work at which point you give up and pay some one handsomely to take them out before they completely take over the whole of the rather unsuitable garden. So yes they probably do get a really bad rep and it's not their fault - but there is till something very satisfactory about seeing that wood pile get smaller. 

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42 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

 the birds would have come back to use them again the next year and I felt really bad about that.

Don't feel too bad about the nests.  Very few species which aren't cavity/hole nesters return to use the same structure.  Possibly the same site but not the same nest.  As an example we have a blackbird it nested last year within a couple of feet of the old nest but didn't use the nest, which incidentally was perfectly preserved as it was shielded from the weather.

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7 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

Is lleylandi Welsh for leylandii ?

They are British Leyland-i. Or i-conifers. 

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Just now, rusty69 said:

They are British Leyland-i. Or i-conifers. 

That's why I know how to spell it - I used to live in Leyland!

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Just now, Jerra said:

Don't feel too bad about the nests.  Very few species which aren't cavity/hole nesters return to use the same structure.  Possibly the same site but not the same nest.  As an example we have a blackbird it nested last year within a couple of feet of the old nest but didn't use the nest, which incidentally was perfectly preserved as it was shielded from the weather.

Oh well perhaps that was why there were so many nests.  I did wonder I hadn't seen more activity for the number of nest that there were. 

 

 

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Just now, Tumshie said:

Oh well perhaps that was why there were so many nests.  I did wonder I hadn't seen more activity for the number of nest that there were. 

*Burp* ...

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Just now, Tumshie said:

Oh well perhaps that was why there were so many nests.  I did wonder I hadn't seen more activity for the number of nest that there were. 

 

 

That is very probably the reason for lots of nests.

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8 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

That's why I know how to spell it - I used to live in Leyland!

I thought you didn't like marinas. 

1200px-1974_Morris_Marina_DL_1.8_Front.jpg

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1 minute ago, rusty69 said:

I thought you didn't like marinas. 

Tanks, trucks and buses in Leyland itself.  Cars were made in furrin' parts. (Cowley)

 

They are all housing estates or retail parks now of course.

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In our last house with a smallish garden the previous owners had planted about 20 small Leylandii along a fence.

The damn things took off about 18 months after we moved in and we realised we were going to lose about a third of our usable garden if they remained. The garden centre labels were still on some of them, they cost £12.99 each. It cost us about the same to get them removed and disposed of!!

 

 

 

 

Then we planted a solitary bamboo plant. That is another story and partially the reason we moved!!!!!!

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6 minutes ago, Dyertribe said:

Then we planted a solitary bamboo plant. That is another story and partially the reason we moved!!!!!!

Terrorised by a bamboo plant. Was it the kind that once planted spreads like wild fire cos that stuff really is a nightmare. 

 

For anybody contemplating the planting of bamboo there are two kinds, the polite and respectful kind that stays where you plant it and the kind that plans to take over the known universe. 

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11 hours ago, tree monkey said:

 

 

Oh and I assume it's not an open fire because that would be exciting 

I'm interested by your comment. A couple of months ago we had a large fallen leylandii bough cheesed up, and the pieces are now stacked up to dry out, so that we can burn them on the stove next winter (if we ever get through our stock of willow from pollarding over a year ago). Does the wood tend to spit when burning? Not that it matters much if it does, as we have a Clearview stove with a door, so the fire is contained - but what's "exciting" about the wood?

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7 minutes ago, Athy said:

I'm interested by your comment. A couple of months ago we had a large fallen leylandii bough cheesed up, and the pieces are now stacked up to dry out, so that we can burn them on the stove next winter (if we ever get through our stock of willow from pollarding over a year ago). Does the wood tend to spit when burning? Not that it matters much if it does, as we have a Clearview stove with a door, so the fire is contained - but what's "exciting" about the wood?

It can spit a tad yes 

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The local kids round here have discovered that if you set fire to the dry brown stuff in the middle of the neglected ones, the whole thing goes up like a Roman Candle.

Even the greenery burns because it is full of resin.

N

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