Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Ginny Cooper

Engine won't turn off.

Featured Posts

I have a Barrus Shire engine. To turn the engine off I press the button next to the ignition switch. The buttons stopped working. I've stopped the engine by turning off the fuel. Anyone know how to rectify the problem. Many thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The stop solenoid shuts down the fuel pump delivery when you press the button. 

Open up your engine box and listen for a click when you press. If there is no click I would bet that the multiplug on the wiring from the control panel to the engine is coming apart, its normally down the side of the engine somewhere.

You can stop the engine manually by pulling the arm on the solenoid on the fuel injection pump. Stopping by turning the fuel off may need you to bleed air out of the pump and pipes before it will start again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost certainly this ^^^^^. Either a dead solonoid, or wiring come apart. Had this happen on my Beta 43 a couple of times and on friends Beta engines too with the multi pin wiring plug/socket coming adrift. Useful to know what bit on the engine to poke to get it to stop. Make sure that hair and loose clothing is out of the way before poking at a running engine anywhere near the drive belts. Sorry, no idea where the stop solonoid is on a Barrus Shire.

 

Jen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is the multi plug I'd scrap them altogether, they're only there for ease of connecting up on engine installation. Deal with one wire at a time, so you don't forget which is which, twist and solder, binding each with self amalgamating tape then binding the bunch with the tape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And now we come to the tragic bit, there was no way of stopping it

  • Haha 1
  • Horror 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't be fazed by Bizzard, he's a kindly soul - but a wicked sense of humour - sometimes it takes a while to work out what (if anything) he means.

Those 15 way plugs and sockets are truly an invention of the Devil (or Biz: on a bad day), but they are all that are available (if you ever want to get the engine out)

 

FWIW, I found that disconnecting both 'halves', inspecting for corrosion, cleaning and pushing both parts back firmly can 'do the trick'. It's important that the cables either side are - supported (ie no strain) if possible or at leas not strained so that "over time", the  two parts can't pull apart.

If you lack confidence perhaps you should join "a maintenance organisation" who will do the awkward stuff for you (but at a cost).   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not clear if you turned the ignition off before or after you pushed the button, before try again (if it starts) with the ignition turned on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, OldGoat said:

Don't be fazed by Bizzard, he's a kindly soul - but a wicked sense of humour - sometimes it takes a while to work out what (if anything) he means.

Those 15 way plugs and sockets are truly an invention of the Devil (or Biz: on a bad day), but they are all that are available (if you ever want to get the engine out)

 

FWIW, I found that disconnecting both 'halves', inspecting for corrosion, cleaning and pushing both parts back firmly can 'do the trick'. It's important that the cables either side are - supported (ie no strain) if possible or at leas not strained so that "over time", the  two parts can't pull apart.

If you lack confidence perhaps you should join "a maintenance organisation" who will do the awkward stuff for you (but at a cost).   

And when you have cleaned and reconnected the multiplug, put a tiewrap through the looms and round both plugs then pull it tight to keep it together.

 

If your engine 'ole is damp seal the rubber boots together with self amalgamating tape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Beta did this, a plug thingy had come adrift behind the stop button thingy next to the ignition switch. Stupid thingys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Bee said:

My Beta did this, a plug thingy had come adrift behind the stop button thingy next to the ignition switch. Stupid thingys.

I hate them 'lectric thingies - all of em

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, RLWP said:

I hate them 'lectric thingies - all of em

How are you posting this comment Richard?  On a steam powered computational device?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

How are you posting this comment Richard?  On a steam powered computational device?

There's the difference between 'lectrics and 'lectronics.  I still rely on a cable that occasionally throws its end from the very inaccessible engine end.

Edited by Ex Brummie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Ex Brummie said:

There's the difference between 'lectrics and 'lectronics.  I still rely on a cable that occasionally throws its end from the very inaccessible engine end.

I think waving bits of wire might be your engine trying to communicate in semaphore ...

Edited by TheBiscuits

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Beta 43 has a fuse located on the left hand side of the engine as viewed from the tiller. This, having failed, took some time to locate and replace. It is a 40 map blade fuse which is not too easy to source on the canal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DaveR said:

My Beta 43 has a fuse located on the left hand side of the engine as viewed from the tiller. This, having failed, took some time to locate and replace. It is a 40 map blade fuse which is not too easy to source on the canal.

That got me going, imagining a forty blade fuse, but then I suppose it was 40 map, with all the right letters, just in the wrong order.

Edited by LadyG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ginny, I’m guessing you’ve been preoccupied with getting it to run again after turning off the fuel? There are a few other things that prevent (earlier) Barrus engines from stopping on the button; and best checked for whilst the engine is stopped. The least obvious can be the relay that lives on the wiring, part way between the engine and the panel. Hold it in your hand whilst pressing the button, you should be able to feel the “click” as it operates. It’s a common 1 inch cube type relay, take it with you if buying a new one as there are two ways in which the pins are numbered and connected internally.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My BMC 1.8 has a solenoid cutout (energize to start). Over the years it's refused to stop the engine several times. It's also been replaced twice. Although never used in anger I've got a 5/8 A/F spanner hanging up in the engine bay. It would only be a matter of seconds to crack the injector pipes and stop the engine that way. Messy but effective. Never had to use it but reassuring to have. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Slim said:

My BMC 1.8 has a solenoid cutout (energize to start). Over the years it's refused to stop the engine several times. It's also been replaced twice. Although never used in anger I've got a 5/8 A/F spanner hanging up in the engine bay. It would only be a matter of seconds to crack the injector pipes and stop the engine that way. Messy but effective. Never had to use it but reassuring to have. :cheers:

I have had this happen for no obvious reason. The solenoid was not faulty, the needle plunger not stuck. Upon replacing the valve I realised that it was closing purely under gravity and that the new valve had a spring which was not present in the original. These solenoids do get quite hot after a while and as the charge voltage rises they get hotter, I wondered if they stuck open when very hot and fitted a ballast resistor to nullify the effects of the alternator controller raising the voltage higher than normal. 

Fitting a light spring from a ball point pen cured  the problem.

The only other reason  I can see for the engine not to stop would be a badly warn injection pump but then I would expect the engine to always refuse to stop.

Edited by Boater Sam
added more

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 31/03/2019 at 23:01, Ex Brummie said:

Has a spade fallen off the solenoid? I've seen that before.

would that be a spade terminal thingy?TE Connectivity Amp 165565-1image.jpeg.d9cb60e5676dde3a58a9cc84601fc6e5.jpeg

Edited by LadyG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, LadyG said:

would that be a spade terminal thingy?

Yes, but that’s not the case for the OP’s engine as if the terminal had fallen off the stop solenoid it would have refused to start, not refuse to stop. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, WotEver said:

Yes, but that’s not the case for the OP’s engine as if the terminal had fallen off the stop solenoid it would have refused to start, not refuse to stop. 

Most engines with “energise to stop” solenoids will start, but not stop. A reasonably reliable way to identify “energise to stop” is the presence of a stop button. Forgot to say that some panels (possibly early Barrus) have a permenant live to the stop button, so the position of the key switch may be irrelevant.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, LadyG said:

would that be a spade terminal thingy?TE Connectivity Amp 165565-1image.jpeg.d9cb60e5676dde3a58a9cc84601fc6e5.jpeg

That's energise to stop.

BMC 1.8D uses a tiny valve that screws directly into the injection pump body and shuts the fuel injection off when NOT energised. Its energised to run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a friend that this happened to. They took it as a portent that they should continue their holiday rather than go back to work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Eeyore said:

Most engines with “energise to stop” solenoids will start, but not stop.

Yes exactly, hence my comment that this isn’t the case with the OP’s engine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.