Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
LadyG

Stanley: the story of industry in the US

Featured Posts

 

How to build a country.

 

 

Edited by LadyG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An interesting film which is a much about self promotion as it is about historical context. Hand tools and metallic Planes were being manufactured in the US more than fifty years before Stanley aquired Leonard Baliey's patent in 1869, yet the film makes scant reference to the inovatory work of hundreds of small manufacturs which enabled Stanley use his wealth to aquire their experience and knowledge. What also made Stanley unique was his entrepreneurial approach, buying up the compertition. and manufacturing on a mass production scale. Don't get me wrong, Stanley Planes are good, and I have several in my workshop which date from the 1880's, and they are used on a regular basis.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, one has to take promotion as par for the course.I  expect Stanley Tools contributed significantly to archive stuff.

To me, the main interest was more the general historic values.

I watched it with interest, thankfully it was short of "Trumphism" Does that make me a Democrat?

Here in the UK we had a similar thing, sort of village blacksmith to Massey Ferguson, I  have an interest in agricultural machinery,  I used to watch "Waggon Train" and then there was Grapes of Wrath, it all sort of fits together..........

Edited by LadyG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People forget (or never knew) that one of the advantages of the American continent is one of scale. Here we had many innovative and quality product that simply cant expand because the home market is too small to turn a craft industry into a large scale manufacturer.

 

As with British industry - I have run out of steam - to expand my thought further.

My Management pours a mean aperitif, to which I am now succumbing. Here's the to memory of General Puffpuffuiff     Hic!

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, OldGoat said:

People forget (or never knew) that one of the advantages of the American continent is one of scale. Here we had many innovative and quality product that simply cant expand because the home market is too small to turn a craft industry into a large scale manufacturer.

 

As with British industry - I have run out of steam - to expand my thought further.

My Management pours a mean aperitif, to which I am now succumbing. Here's the to memory of General Puffpuffuiff     Hic!

Peopple forget (or never knew) that one of the Advantages of The British Isles in the 19th and first half of the 20th century was one of scale.  The British Empire was not only a source of materials but a vast market to sell what was produced as well as other consumer markets around the world.

 

To a large extent the Empire was about trade rather than military might.

 

An example would be the cotton industry.  Britain was at one point the worlds largest producer of cotton cloth but did not grow cotton. 

 

Industries like railway locomotives and technology were exported across the globe also foe example.  Britain had an advantage of a very large empire so the size of the domestic market was not a limiting factor for British companies in both new technologies or traditional industries.

 

One also only has to look at the scale of populations to see what was going on. The USA was about 75 million in 1900, the UK about 45 million and the British Empire as a total (including India) was about 670 million or about 40% of the worlds population.

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, OldGoat said:

People forget (or never knew) that one of the advantages of the American continent is one of scale. Here we had many innovative and quality product that simply cant expand because the home market is too small to turn a craft industry into a large scale manufacturer.

 

Well it didn't stop Stanley Tools from purchasing Chapmans, the Sheffield plane making company in 1938, in order to set up a factory to manufacture Stanley planes, in the UK, and despite the fact that Hamptons had been making Stanley type Record planes for almost ten years.  I always felt that the equivalent Record planes were superior to the UK mades Stanleys, with the US made Stanleys being superior to both.

 

 

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Batavia said:

Patrick Leach's website contains everything you could wish to know about Stanley planes and is very amusing.  Read his comments about the #55 and #193.

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html

 

Chris G

 I am familiar with that site which has some interesting observations, but very little detail about patent changes which are important to the collector. This site provides that information in great detail :-

 

https://www.rexmill.com/planes101/typing/typing.htm

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then there is this book, which is long out of print. I have been offered silly money for my copy.

 

image.png.b1ac7538144175d4cdfe671d99eb957b.png

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, David Schweizer said:

 I am familiar with that site which has some interesting observations, but very little detail about patent changes which are important to the collector. This site provides that information in great detail :-

 

https://www.rexmill.com/planes101/typing/typing.htm

 

 

1

thanks for posting the link. I have been able to date the Stanley plane I have which is supposed to be my grandfathers but I have not been sure.  It looks like to date to the 2nd half of the 1920s which would tie in with buying it when he was married.

 

I still use it when required and does as good a job now as I imagine it did new.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, David Schweizer said:

Then there is this book, which is long out of print. I have been offered silly money for my copy.

 

 

 

 

There are some copies for sale on abe at the minute for not-to-silly money!

 

Chris G

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, churchward said:

thanks for posting the link. I have been able to date the Stanley plane I have which is supposed to be my grandfathers but I have not been sure.  It looks like to date to the 2nd half of the 1920s which would tie in with buying it when he was married.

 

I still use it when required and does as good a job now as I imagine it did new.

That will be one made in the US. If it still has it's original "Sweetheart" blade. that will be thinner, and more efficient, than the modern ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have often wondered:- why has the knob for the depth adjustment got a left hand thread? It has confused me for more than 50 years!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, davidb said:

I have often wondered:- why has the knob for the depth adjustment got a left hand thread? It has confused me for more than 50 years!

The early models had a standard R/H thread, but it was changed to L/H in 1892 so that the blade was advanced forward when turning the knob clockwise, mirroring the action of turning a woodscrew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, David Schweizer said:

That will be one made in the US. If it still has it's original "Sweetheart" blade. that will be thinner, and more efficient, than the modern ones.

Yes, it has all the patent numbers and made in the US stamps plus the sweetheart logo as you say.  As far as I know, it is in original condition.  Neither my father or grandfather were woodworkers just home DIY folk so it has only had light use but cared for over the years.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, churchward said:

Yes, it has all the patent numbers and made in the US stamps plus the sweetheart logo as you say.  As far as I know, it is in original condition.  Neither my father or grandfather were woodworkers just home DIY folk so it has only had light use but cared for over the years.  

What Number plane is it? The most popular are No, 4 and No. 5, although I prefer the No.3 for lighter work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, David Schweizer said:

What Number plane is it? The most popular are No, 4 and No. 5, although I prefer the No.3 for lighter work.

I think without looking it is a No.4,  it is about 10in long and a 2 inch blade width.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.