Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
New boater 1976

Mooring and boats

Featured Posts

Hi everyone I'm after some help and advice. I'm looking to joining all you guys and girls in the boating community this year after losing the best job in the world at Sandwell hospital due to ill health 5 years ago which made disabled I want my independence back. First question is about the boat do I go for a centre cockpit of rear cockpit boat I can walk but not long distance and my legs wobble so need a walking stick I ask this has not sure what type is easier to get on board. Second question is about mooring does anyone know of any cheap mooring site, bottom of a farmer field etc in the west midland as I have never been on a boat before so would like to keep the cost down for the first year incase its not my cup of tea, I will not be living on the boat I would just like to use it for little breaks to help boost my mental health and independence. Thank you so much to anyone who replies. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forums the experts will be along shortly , some moorings are cheaper than others but I don't think a cheap as in cheap mooring exists tbh they all cost. If you have never been on a boat before then I would at least holiday on one before you commit money and probably quite a bit of it to this lifestyle change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ease of getting aboard and a mooring in a farmer's field seem incompatible to me.  I think if you want to ease yourself into boating given the your constraints you mention, starting cheap may be counterproductive. I'd suggest that the easiest consistent boarding option is stepping onto a narrowboat in an inland marina purposely designed with this in mind. You'll also have electricity and water on hand which makes life aboard much easier and will allow your boat to double up as a holiday cottage for those breaks too. Once you have boating weighed off you may then be better prepared for that farmer's field.  You'll also find a mooring in a marina much more easily.  Hope that helps. :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Sea Dog said:

Ease of getting aboard and a mooring in a farmer's field seem incompatible to me.  I think if you want to ease yourself into boating given the your constraints you mention, starting cheap may be counterproductive. I'd suggest that the easiest consistent boarding option is stepping onto a narrowboat in an inland marina purposely designed with this in mind. You'll also have electricity and water on hand which makes life aboard much easier and will allow your boat to double up as a holiday cottage for those breaks too. Once you have boating weighed off you may then be better prepared for that farmer's field.  You'll also find a mooring in a marina much more easily.  Hope that helps. :)

 

The "dog" speaks a lot of sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a look at the Pumphouse at Titford. Usually spaces there as not everyones cup of tea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much. I agree a proper mooring site than a farmers field would benefit me a lot more and make it easier and comfortable for me thank you so much everyone so far and I will have a look at the pump house might even go and look today as its not far from me at all thank you so much once again. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have mobility issues will it affect your ability to work lock gates?

Just being practical.

Some of them are very heavy to start moving.

Edited by Ray T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it will that's why I will cruise with my doughter and wife my doughter is quite strong. Thank you for the information about the locks being heavy is type of information that is very useful to me and all please don't be afraid to question me or give constructive criticism I will take everything on board I really can't make it work without looking at every obstacle and how to overcome it thank you so much. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would add how about climbing up and down lock ladders and/or pulling the boat into and out of locks if you intend to single hand at all.

 

The talk of aft or centre cockpit makes me think that you are looking at GRP cruisers because there are not many centre cockpit steel narrowboats. I find it far easier to get on and off a cruiser stern narrowboat than the vast majority of GRP cruisers but I suspect a aft cockpit narrowbeam cruiser will be almost as easy. A lot depends upon the height of the cockpit floor and the gunwale height.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When we are out cruising ,my wife works all the lock gates so you should be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you think that locks may be difficult for you to do, then take that in consideration when looking where to keep the boat.  For example the suggested Titford plump house is at the top of a flight of 6 locks so you need to those each time to go anywhere.

 

I you need to be on the BCN to be close to home, then if you could find a mooring on the Wolverhampton level then you have a good amount of cruising without needing to do locks.  So somewhere like Longwood boat club would fit the bill.  

 

Alternatively if you are happy to travel a bit further to the boat, then on the Coventry canal once above Atherstone locks you have lots of rural canal in the Coventry and Ashby with no locks.  If you did the stop lock at Hawkesbury then you can go down the North Oxford to Hilmorton, and then with the 3 locks at Hillmorton you can go all the way to Napton with no more locks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi and welcome to the forum, when you mention centre or rear cockpit I am thinking that you may be looking at things like GRP Viking, Dawncraft and Normans in the mid 20s-30s feet in length. Of course I may be wide of the mark but you may find the step up to a cruiser higher than that onto a narrowboat if that would cause issues. As you have just mentioned family along with you, the crew size is more than sufficient to handle movements and locks. I always like the idea of centre cockpit cruisers but have never had one. I guess it is how you would use the boat. With children/guests a rear cabin can increase privacy for all. For the single DIYer it can become the 'shed'. I've seen GRP cruisers with them added on and boats where original ones have been cut off, dictated by the requirements of the owner at a given time. A large back deck is great when cruising a lot, for sitting out on or setting up a workmate. There are (dis)advantages for both imho. My advice in general is to start cheap and see if you like it. A mooring will be the biggest expense, if the sparcity of facilities on a farmer's field won't be an issue then you could easily pay only half the cost of a plush marina. An expensive bad boat project can be terrible for time, money, stress and health. However, a simple, start cheap, approach can be a tonic for mental wellbeing and calm if you find you enjoy the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I am thinking about a grp cruiser will be looking at spending upto 15k for my first boat would love a big narrow boat but need to be realistic and start small just incase its not my cup of tea but I'm sure I will love it. Need to buy a good one that doesn't really need a lot of work. 

Thank you again 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally if I were you I would hire a day boat for a day. That will highlight any boarding issues you may have at minimal cost.

 

Then if you still want to procede, hire a boat for at least a long weekend. That will give you a better idea of boating and living in a confined space.

 

Then if you still want to go boating get your own boat and mooring.

 

 

Edited by cuthound
Missing space

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other methods will vary, but if I had that budget and looking for GRP I would set aside maybe 1/3 of it for things that could seriously ruin a boating season by going wrong. If the engine turns out to be a complete basket case after a month you will really want to repair it / replace it asap in the summer. Basic costs such as licence, mooring, insurance and BSS test can be added to with RCR cover (mobile mechanics etc), moorings away from your home one, petrol and gas plus general things breaking, needing painting, wearing out or being dropped in the cut. If everything goes right and much of the contingency fund isn't needed then you can possibky upgrade or buy another boat for the following season, knowing that you will be willing to invest in a boat if it develops issues. £15k imho is a healthy budget for a GRP cruiser. Two thirds or less of that can buy you a nice centre cockpit cruiser of 80s vintage that has been well cared for and comes with a decent engine, pretty much ready to go cruising.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having owned both a GRP cruiser and a steel narrowboat,I can say the narrowboat is easier to get on and off.

The cockpit floor on the GRP boat was low and involved stepping up to the gunwales to alight and stepping down when getting aboard.

The narrowboat rear deck is level with the gunwales and is much easier.

There are other issues with a GRP boat on the canals,(only going from my own experience) they can be a sod to steer and moor up and cast off when it is windy

because of their lighter weight,and usually outboard powered and wheel steering (which is usually pretty vague).

As a matter of interest,you can get a narrowboat for your budget.Mine is a 30 foot built 1978 and was bought two years ago for £15K and was ready for use.

Very little needed doing and is still going strong. I was lucky I suppose.

Suggest you hire a boat for a week or so to see if it suits you. You will then know if boating is for you without committing several £K to it. 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good thinking about keeping money aside for any unseen problems though the season I will take it all on board. 

Thank you

Where's the best place to look at buying I'v been looking on line but does anyone know of a recommended Brooker for buying a cruiser. 

Will also look at narrow boat and will look at hiring one for a weekend or week. You lot are so helpful I can't believe how nice everyone as been. 

Thank you

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the Forum, New Boater 1976.  Farmers' fields are not a good idea if you have mobility issues.  The main reason, I think, is that the nearest access to a road could be a long, long way from the canal bank, with no easy paths.  Another serious concern for me would be leaving the boat out in the middle of nowhere when you're not using it - maybe for weeks at a time.  (I'm a leisure boater like you plan to be.  I have a 23-foot GRP boat for day trips with grandchildren and only the occasional few nights away now and then.  I'm still seeing where boat ownership will lead me).  I live not far from you and keep my boat in a Marina.  I can park my car just a few yards away from the boat, there are marina staff who live on site, and there are other boaters around a lot of the time, who can offer help and advice with all sorts of boating issues.  Of course, you have to pay for a place in a marina, but I think it's worth it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, New boater 1976 said:

Yes it will that's why I will cruise with my doughter and wife my doughter is quite strong. Thank you for the information about the locks being heavy is type of information that is very useful to me and all please don't be afraid to question me or give constructive criticism I will take everything on board I really can't make it work without looking at every obstacle and how to overcome it thank you so much. 

It's probably not a popular view in our age of inclusivity, but people with disabilities such as the ones you describe, should really think carefully about being on boats at all. In the case of a fire or even sinking are you going to be able to get off the boat quickly? If so then fine, but you do need to consider this and if necessary have a plan in place.

 

Others will have different opinions, but my common sense approach puts safety way ahead of inclusivity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, New boater 1976 said:

Yes I am thinking about a grp cruiser will be looking at spending upto 15k for my first boat would love a big narrow boat but need to be realistic and start small just incase its not my cup of tea but I'm sure I will love it. Need to buy a good one that doesn't really need a lot of work. 

Thank you again 

Have you considered hiring a boat for a couple of weeks to find out how you would be able to cope? Whilst that might cost a bit, it would be much cheaper than buying a boat and then finding it doesn't suit you.
And from my experience a cruiser stern narrow boat is much easier to board than either types of cruiser than you mention. They invariably seem to have large/high steps to overcome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am thinking, in that area maybe the Curly Wurly would be a good place to base your boat on? Lots of lovely canal, no locks (until you go further...) so you'd have plenty opportunity to get out and about at least a little way before needing to do locks and have a crew to help.

 

What's that mooring with a service area and which has decent parking nearby and hard/paved access up to the bankside?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.