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fittie

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    340
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About fittie

  • Birthday August 3

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    The Lakes
  • Interests
    breathing

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    SEN Teacher
  • Boat Name
    Lancing
  • Boat Location
    Stockton

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  1. I think that you are dead right. The thing is this could have a real negative effect on canal side businesses as less passing traffic and therefore less footfall. One business owner was talking about closing for the summer and having an extended holiday.
  2. Things really change in 1976 re closing gates a paddles etc. That was when I was first aware of signs about saving water and close gates etc.
  3. That's my point really. Because the pressure on a flight being spread over all the day light hours (mostly) it is now going to be condensed into a smaller window, what ever time they decide and the pumps can not keep up with that kind of demand whey they most likely have a better chance of keeping on top of things if the demand for water was spread a little thiner . Just a thought.
  4. It doesn't stop anything unless someone walks the flight to check all gates are shut and paddles down before locking up.
  5. Restrictions have already appeared on the Whilton/Buckby locks as well as others, I was wondering if restriction the time you can access the flight actually saves any water? We entered the flight as soon as poss and I know the were boats "trapped" over night in the flight and some pounds were already down quite a bit. The pumps can not cope with all the boat movements happening over a short period of time and to that end it would be better if the movements were spread out over a longer period? People sharing looks would help more and not turning a look when in the next lock is a boat. It would be better to wait for the boat and then turn the lock thus saving a lock full. Just a thought. I'm not looking towards boating in the summer with shed loads of restrictions like it was in '76.
  6. Yep, scruffy dog was standard issue.
  7. In the bottom picture, with the GU pair, the thing on the end of the chain is the actual tiller pin as new.
  8. I think the the digging out of the arm/loop has come to an end and it is not going to be in water any time soon.
  9. Regarding locks, in my copy of the Thames Conservancy Launch Digest (1973) it does say, "stop your engine." Has it been up dated?
  10. From around 1943 the old canister that would have been in the bag had gone so the bag for the new gas masks was smaller so no need form the bigger bags. New light weight gas mask was the reason for the new bags.
  11. I was offered a chain and told that it was from WW1, well that's what the old boatman told the vendor. When did these end up as chimney chain? Post 1942 ish would be my guess. Not before WW2 at any rate.
  12. Three bags from the same maker. Indiana Jones used a W&G made type 7 bag a few years before they even existed. Hay-ho.
  13. Re the pictures of gas mask links: the first two are from the pre war years 1930s (most likely would have seen action in the yearly part of the war with the BEF) The next two are from type V-c and / or type 6 introduced from 1939 to about 1941. The hook with the flat link I think is older than the slightly more simple hook. The last is a type 7 (no hooks) and was introduced in 1941. Made famous by one I Jones! So the links with the D ring attached were only about for a couple of years
  14. No pasties but I did have a few sherbets though.
  15. We pasted Mr Hewitt while boating in 2017, I was going to say last year but a new one has come along, as we were pasting a rather nondescript boat when a voice shouts out, "That's my old boat". I asked what he thought of it to which he replied. "Bloody marvellous!" Which is good to know.
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