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Showing content with the highest reputation on 25/01/24 in all areas

  1. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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  5. I will end this little series with a mention of the Official Visit. During the '50s, '60s and '70s, the Canal received official visits from units of the Royal Navy, the RAF, and various other organisations. For the Navy and RAF visits, the ship received a visit from the Mayor and Sheriff, and the commanding officer, a lieutenant or flight lieutenant, would be entertained, in his full dress uniform, in the medieval Guildhall for tea and a ceremonial signing of the City's visitor book. The most ambitious event was the arrival in the River Exe, via the canal, of four Belgian MSI class inshore minesweepers. Built in 1957/8 by the Mercantile Marine Yard, Kruibeke, Belgian they were similar to the Royal Navy's Ham class. They drew 2.10 m. powered by twin Nuove Reggiane diesels of 1260cv, with a maximum speed of 15 kts. They were opened to the public, and great fun it was. But on the way up the canal, mud and debris had been sucked up and blocked the engine filters, so each had to be towed down the Canal behind the Exmouth pilot boat, with a local fishing boat hanging on the stern. The photos show the four alongside Exeter Quay, one being towed by the pilot boat, and, finally, two moored below Double Locks, with the third in the lock. The pilot boat was locally built and served the estuary and Exmouth for many years. That is it. I hope you enjoyed the photos. None of them have been published before.
    3 points
  6. How about you not posting offensive comments, and go back to the first post in this thread to see what the OP intended!
    2 points
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  11. It is popular, its cheap, and it works. I think those of us with an engineering background don't like it because its just not nice. It is relying on what might be an emergency shutdown components to work on a routine basis. My main concern is that its possibly not very kind to the lead-acid battery and it will not be obvious when this battery is getting into poor condition. Worse case is the lead-acid failing with a shorted cell and all the lithiums energy dumping into it. If you do go this route then I suggest routine replacement of the lead acid battery every two or three years.
    2 points
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  14. It's worth trying to find out what specifically caused the pitting in the first place. For example, if the boat is fairly new or has been looked after well by regular blacking, use of a galvanic isolator etc. and it's still badly pitted then I'd be pretty concerned that either the steel is poor quality or that there are significant issues with the electrical set up of the boat. Either way you can look forward to ongoing problems with corrosion. On the other hand, if the boat is old, perhaps been neglected, maybe has been stuck in a marina for years on a hook-up, with no galvanic isolator, or maybe even kept in brackish water, then pits down to 4mm would seem perfectly reasonable and it would therefore be reasonably to presume that looking after the boat well in future would prevent significant further corrosion.
    2 points
  15. I think it's getting increasingly difficult to get volunteers. Obviously this depends to a degree upon what type of volunteering it is, but generally they tend to be retired or semi-retired people, and as each generation of retirees evolve, more of them seem to have other interests to pursue so don't have the time or inclination to volunteer. Add to this is the fact that many are having to stay in work for longer due to the changes in the retirement age and/or due to economic necessity and this exacerbates the problem further.
    2 points
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  17. Captain's Tom's daughter might have some nice second hand building materials going cheap. 🤔
    2 points
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  21. It does help when you have lived in the area for a good few years, another image taken by the late Alan T Smith M.B.E at the 1962 Rally, the yellow pontoon conversion was our family boat. so I had a bit of ahead start.
    2 points
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  24. The other thing to be aware of is that the emerging US requirements call for their to be alarms /warnings in good time before the battery protection system shuts off the power. This is obviously lumpy water driven as no one wants to find themselves in mid shipping lane, at night with no power. Not so much of a problem on our cut, except perhaps in a long tunnel, but anything the BSS requires will have to be vonsistent with a lumpy water position. A drop-in solution with most of today's batteries cannot meet that. One reason is that their BMS only does cut-off and not warnings followed by cut-off. The other is that few batteries enable access to the BMS except through an app. N
    1 point
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  26. It does (it's still an old green paper one), but I also did training/testing years ago so I could drive a bigger (17-seater?) minibus for a local community organisation -- I think this was their requirement, not a legal one.
    1 point
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  28. I didn't mean that the unintended consequence was that volunteers are protected, I absolutely agree that everybody should be kept safe. The unintended consequence I meant, was that it makes it more expensive to have volunteers, maybe side effect is a better way of describing it.
    1 point
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  31. Pushing rubber hose onto a plain ended pipe and "secured" with a worm drive hose clip is a bodge. Hose is meant to be onto proper "Christmas Tree" tails, or at least a secured olive.
    1 point
  32. The oyster shell was for chickens. Below, if it works, is a photo of sacks of Viking oyster shell. It is not the hold of Nova Zembla but of the Lukas M. built in Holland in 1948. I think that on this occasion, some stevedores were helping unloading because the Council Matador mobile crane was being used. Maybe it was always used for unloading oyster shell. I simply cannot remember. Just as a matter of interest, compare the Lucas M's welded construction with that of the Goeree, another Exeter visitor in the period 1966/9. In those days all you had to do was to look interested and you could nip aboard...
    1 point
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  34. Hi everyone and thanks for the input. I'm not a designer but used to have a barge that I took across the Channel and all round France, Belgium, Netherlands and across Germany to Poland and back, so have quite a bit of experience as a user, and a clear idea about what works and what doesn't. If I can find a builder that can do the hull design for a cut down Luxemotor, all well and good. If not, the Branson 34ft hull is perfectly Ok for what I want and would just need a few changes to the superstructure. Branson can do this for a fee and produce the cutting files, in which case I would just need a competent yard who can do the build and supervise the fitout. I also want to find a yard that builds to a quoted price, and not like the "bespoke" yard I'm currently dealing with that has a contract with a clause saying they can put up the price during build if their costs go up. (The yard in question has been mentioned on this forum before, and I would endorse what has been said). Interesting that a few replies have mentioned RW Davis. I was actually up there last week looking at an American style trawler hull they have. My last boat was an twin engine trawler yacht and its my second favourite boat style after the Dutch barge. I was impressed by what I saw at the yard and appreciate the endorsements I've seen on the forum here. Thanks for that. I'm also thinking of going (at least hybrid) electric, but have no experience of that, and would appreciate any feedback anyone has. By the way, on the question of whether a boat built in the UK counts as a Dutch barge, ---Brussels sprouts don't always come from you-know-where 🙂
    1 point
  35. My point was that the BSS has a history of applying different standards from those required by the relevant ISO. A simple example being that the ISO allows soldered lpg gas connections such as you would find in a house, whereas the BSS does not. So a boat built in full compliance with the RCD/RCR can still be a "fail" for the BSS. Similarly, things that are allowed by the BSS are contrary to the ISOs applicable to the RCD/RCR. So in answer to your final question, who knows?!
    1 point
  36. Yes assuming it was your lift pump that failed, which if it died in the same manner as mine then theres a good chance it is. It's not too difficult a job. On my original pump they had cut the flared ends off and used compression fittings but I didnt wanna do that as i'd have to use a hacksaw and risk getting the swarf up inside the pump so I trimmed the copper pipe work back a bit (using a proper pipe cutter) and just used 8mm rubber pipe and jubilees as you can see from the pics. The pump itself come off easy enough if you can get to it ok. I had to remove the lower 10mm bolt by feel as access is difficult on my boat. Hopefully you'll have a new gasket with yours. Mine didn't do I had to make one but luckily already had some gasket paper. Good luck with it!
    1 point
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  39. It might be in your best interest to consider the possibility that some pits MIGHT be microbial corrosion and if so grit blasting might not get rid of it, it might need further processes. If it is microbial corrosion, then it may stay active under the said epoxy, deepening the pit and making the coating fall off. It seems many yards do not yet understand microbial corrosion.
    1 point
  40. Viking still make them so obviously it is worth "producing boats for such a small market" I agree with all that. For information, Juno is a Viking 23 and has always had a 10hp engine, easily big enough unless you want to stem the tide in the Avon Gorge. Can I add, it would be helpful if those of us who do own grp cruisers weren't frequently contradicted by some posters who clearly do not. Some of the things said about GRP cruisers above can only come from people who've never had one. GRP cruisers are economic and practical - I'd have given up boat ownership long ago if narrow boats were the only option. Even a 23 foot steel narrow boat would cost far more to run over, say, ten years, than a fibreglass cruiser does.
    1 point
  41. Is the restriction on changing the appearance listed on the title to the property at the Land Registry? If it is not then it is unlikely that BWB/CRT can legally enforce the restriction. You can get a copy of your title from the Land Registry website for £3 (unless it's gone up lately). The restriction was imposed by BWB, but has their 'interest' in the matter been transferred to CRT, or would you need to address this with the organisation which is now only interested in the Scottish waterways (and probably supremely uninterested in a house they once owned in England)? The CRT website Estates page at https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/business-and-trade/estates suggests you should contact CRT at Ellesmere Port in the first instance.
    1 point
  42. Li batteries are fantastic. However, there are a lot of pitfalls and it is not easy to put together an effective system. Why fantastic? Well they are just like a big bucket of electricity. You can pour energy in as fast as the tap will run. You can discharge it way down to nearly 0% and still the voltage stays up around 13v. No need to fully charge between uses. It is worth bearing in mind that Ah is not a unit of energy, because for that you need to mulitply by the voltage. So 100Ah of lead acid (LA), where the discharge voltage is 12 to 12.6, is worth less energy than 100Ah of Lithium (Li) where the discharge voltage is 13 - 13.3v. So more energy for the same Ah. And that is before you remember that you shouldn't really discharge your LA below 50% Soc, whereas you can discharge the Li to 10% or lower quite happily. So 100Ah of Li is worth about 200Ah of LA. That is the good news. The bad news is that, being a big bucket of electricity, a Li battery will hoover up 100% of the maximum output from an alternator until it is nearly full. Alternators fitted to boats are generally not rated for continuous operation at maximum output, and so they will fry themselves in fairly short order. There needs to be some means to limit the maximum alternator output, to protect the alternator. Other things with Li: They hate being overcharged or even held at charging voltage once they are full. The mantra is "charge to full, then STOP CHARGING". Full is defined as charge current reduced to 5% of capacity. This can be easier said than done because many charge sources don't recognise when the battery is full. They (hopefully) have a built in battery management system (BMS) that is there to protect the cells by disconnecting the battery if a cell voltage gets too high or too low or too cold. However if the BMS decides to disconnect the battery when it is being charged by an alternator, a massive voltage spike will ensue which can damage the alternator and other equipment connected to the electrical system. So IMO one should avoid triggering the "battery emergency disconnect" algorithm in the BMS. ie set a charge voltage that is somewhat lower than the BMS cutoff voltage. The BMS protection should be considered "last resort" not "day to day control". For the solar, you can set a fairly low charge voltage around 14.1v or so (which will still get the battery nearly full) and a float voltage much lower, say 13.3v so that no more current flows into the battery. The absorption time (time between reaching the charging voltage, and going to float) should be very short, maybe 10 minutes. It is a bit problematic in summer if the boat is not being used - every day the batteries are pushed up to their charged voltage, without anything being taken out. This is not very good for them. So not much of an issue if you are aboard permanently, but if you leave the boat unattended with no loads on, disconnect the solar panels. He and I both have the Fogstar in a caravan! But the Fogstar is good for a caravan because it has the built in heating element. If you try to charge the battery at too low a temperature, the charge is diverted to heating elements until the battery is warm enough. However on a boat, where the canal water is a great temperature stabiliser, low battery temperature is unlikely to be much of an issue especially as you can site the Li battery within the cabin where it is hopefully warm! Otherwise, the Fogstar seems well put together but it does have quite a conservative BMS so it would be inportant to make sure the charge voltage doesn't trigger the BMS shutoff.
    1 point
  43. It is worth remembering that the term 'drop in replacement' is a slightly deceptive marketing term. All it actually means is that the batteries are the same shape and can be 'dropped in' without modifying the battery tray or boxes. It gives the impression that the lithium batteries can be used instead of the lead acid batteries, with existing charging arrangements, but this is not what it means. The only really simple way to have lithium batteries is to have them charged by solar panels and a mains charger and not the engine. Otherwise it gets more complicated because of their power demand when being charged by a rotating electrical machine. People do it but it is a bit awkward.
    1 point
  44. Dunno what you mean about "certain African countries", the UK is right there at the top of the list with the PPE scandal, multiple fraudulent business support loans during the pandemic, and the Post Office farrago. Corruption in the building planning departments has been endemic and widely known for years - rememer Poulson? Obviously not. While I suppose the UK probably now qualifies as a third world country , dividing corrupt governments into those run largely by white or black blokes is simply racist. You can't get a lot more corrupt than the US system - they (and us) just pretend it's normal and bother to pass laws that almost make it legal, and certainly harder to spot. As far as sinecures for relatives go, you seem to have forgotten the MPs expenses scandals, with most of their relatives getting whacking great pay packets for bugger all. And that hasn't changed, either. And, what's more, this sort of discussion should be in the politics section, not here. This is one topic that ought to get back to the subject pronto.
    1 point
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  47. No cutting and shutting with other boats involved. As I understand it the original footing (lower hull side) plating was removed, leaving the knees and chine angle in place. A new piece of plate was then fitted, welded horizontally to the original side plating above and with vertical welds between sections of new plate, but riveted to the original chine angle and knees. A new lower guard was also riveted on. In your case it looks like one of the new rivets has gone through the horizontal welded joint. The result is a hull that looks internally and externally just like the original, apart from the new weld lines. This is commonly found on GU boats - the same was done to Fulbourne and Belfast.
    1 point
  48. I think that might be against forum rules. Where would this site be if everyone did that!
    1 point
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