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Showing content with the highest reputation on 29/11/23 in all areas

  1. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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  5. Surely the answer is: if there is a hole in the hull and water is coming in, drill another hole to let the water out. 😁
    3 points
  6. Carpet tiles can be basic or high quality. Basic are cheap. Easy to fit and you can keep spares to replace areas that get trashed more quickly.
    3 points
  7. I may have answered own question from old pis I’ve found but advise still much appreciated even I’ve spelt wrong… Engine bay now cleaned out
    2 points
  8. I suspect her hose won’t start.
    2 points
  9. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  10. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  11. 2 points
  12. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  13. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  14. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  15. Saw a guy once put chains across a wide lock on the GU from bollard to bollard. Then put boat over chains. Then drained lock. Was then seen to be blacking boat from a dinghy
    2 points
  16. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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  18. Any statutory matters are now administered by Historic England. English Heritage who now just look after certain historic buildings were spun off as a charity like CRT, several years ago,
    2 points
  19. On this day, 2021 A snow covered Fradley junction. @PeterScott a snow covered post
    2 points
  20. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  21. Solid or engineered wood needs regular upkeep - sealing etc and is not especially tolerant of high levels of moisture. Top quality vinyl, karndean etc is much easier in terms of mopping up muddy footprints.
    2 points
  22. Karndean. But it needs to be laid on a well prepared very smooth and flat surface. Very hard wearing, stain resistant and ideal on a boat. We had it on ours and now have it at home too.
    2 points
  23. Well all those locks that have had steel gates for 50 years are still working, so phooey!
    2 points
  24. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  25. Small price to pay for my only child's wellbeing
    2 points
  26. This photo of a spoon dredger on the Spring's branch of the L&LC. The angled beam has been lowered so that it sticks out over the side, with a chain or rope attached to the spoon passing around a pulley on the end of the beam and then onto the windlass. The spoon is then lowered onto the canal bed and pulled into the mud by the windlass, the spoon being controlled by handle held by the man on the right shows the system in use
    2 points
  27. Thank you 😊
    1 point
  28. I didn't know Salters made lifeboats. The crane is still there in the pub garden. Folly Bridge. And I think the college barge in the image may have survived and be this one https://www.absolute-homes.co.uk/property/river-thames-houseboat-living-residential-mooring-london-marina/ May be another one there were quite a few at one stage not many did survive. Looks like a replica but apparently an old one. "Balliol College Oxford, purchased this barge in 1837 from the City of London Livery Skinners’ Company to use as changing rooms, common room and viewing stand. It is only one of 6 known to still be in existence and was the last barge to be built. " The one in the original picture says City of London on the back which is what took me to this.
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. I think that @frahkn's question related to how are you measuring the consumption, rather than what the consumption is supposed to be. Few boats have fuel gauges that accurate and there is always a possibility you had some fuel syphoned out.
    1 point
  31. He's in business, this business. Very nice work, which I have seen on his boat . It's going to be £2K in materials, and a week's work, mostly off-site At first I suggested I would buy the items, but he said it was not necessary as he had an account with Howdens, and I believe he has already those items flat packed at his workshop. I have asked him to invoice me by email, for the next lot of items, but have not had a response , I just do not like paying out bank transfer with no paper trail. It's just not how I do business. I've already paid some money, but had to write a covering email explaining this was a pre payment for work. So I've paid out moneys, but have no paper trail, other than my own. There is no reason for this casual approach. Yes, unfortunately there is already a layer of some cheapo softwood laid by a previous owner, I fear it must be glued on to the floor of boat, and I have laid my thick vinyl on top , so easiest may be just put another layer on top of that. I struggle to get down on my knees these days so I really don't want to do it myself if the boat fitter is on site it's best to get him to do it imho. It might be best to do this before the kitchen cabinets, and new table leg, or it might not ( there is a new table chrome leg required for the new table).
    1 point
  32. I put reclaimed teak finger parquet down. Small pieces. Lots of it on eBay where people take it out of their houses. It usually still has some adhesive on it but I found by using Lecol latex floor adhesive its been fine. This is onto a plywood substrate. Not everyone's cup of tea but I wouldn't choose anything else. The fingers are about 3/8" thick / 9mm ish.
    1 point
  33. It's in the special section, next to the lift bridge documents ...
    1 point
  34. Sole traders often use a personal bank account.
    1 point
  35. We have Karndean Loose Lay. No glue is used so easy to put down and then lift up if needed
    1 point
  36. Flotex flooring is the bees knees for floors. It’s wet scrubbable incredibly hard wearing and warm to the feet. It looks and feels like carpet but wears and cleans like vinyl. It’s also VERY expensive and the designs can be a bit naff. We got a grey stripe (which looks good) roll end off eBay and its brilliant. You can get rolls or tiles . Suggest you google it and see if you can find any roll ends. It may mean ringing round a few specialist suppliers
    1 point
  37. What was the nature of the maintenance that allowed the bollards to endure this type of abuse?
    1 point
  38. I didn't know at the time, I found out 20 minutes later when I was in the sauna and mentioned the incident to another young guy of about 22 who I got talking to. He was a local who paid for membership of the hotel facilities and he told me he knew who they were as they often caused trouble and the hotel staff had banned them previously. As soon as he told me they were "p*keys" (his words not mine) what they'd done to me made sense. Listen, I take people as they come. Good people are good people and arseholes are arseholes. I've no axe to grind against any particular community, but those who say that Irish gypsies or travellers are just the same as anyone else have either not experienced the extent of antisocial behaviour of young travellers, or they're in some sort of ideological denial.
    1 point
  39. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  40. Varnish?? More likely just photographed on a wet day!
    1 point
  41. I do hope not. Its painting timber that starts the rot. Would be much better built in steel then they would not need to be replaced every 25 years, maximum, Most of the 1970s steel gates are still in service and working fine. They were only built in oak because it was cheap and plentiful. Its time we ignored heritage and had a working canal system with minimal maintenance and more cost effective.
    1 point
  42. Glad they’re putting on lots of varnish to keep them waterproof and to offer them some protection from narrowboats ramming them👍
    1 point
  43. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  44. Its a bit of a special boat with a hand rail and boards full length, not an ice breaker either.
    1 point
  45. Get coal in 10kg bags And gas in 10kg Flogas lite cylinders 🤔
    1 point
  46. Is the alternator battery of machine sensing? If the latter, then the sense wire may have developed a resistive connection or has become disconnected. If machine sensed then you are correct, a diode may have failed, especially a field diode and that may well cause the warning lamp to glow and provide excess voltage, but I would find a local specialist and get the thing tested. However, I have no idea how the A to B would react. You must check the ALTERNATOR output voltage a B+ and preferably with the A to B bypassed.
    1 point
  47. Fault finding by instinct and sudden dislike of a particular item isn't a cost effective approach. Not one to use when cash is short. Diagnosing and fixing the existing alternator sounds a better idea.
    1 point
  48. That was my thinking when I installed my gas system, it's a very easy way to test the system. Other forum members constantly deride bubble testers, usually without explaining exactly why they don't like them. By the way, when I test my system which I do at least every time I change a gas bottle, I press the button for a full minute. I've got one of those cheap magnetic LED lights attached to the bottle to make sure there's enough light shining though the sight glass of the bubble tester. The bubble tester only tests the low pressure side of the system after the regulator, so after I change a bottle I also spray a bit of leak detector spray (Screwfix) onto the brass pigtail fitting which goes into the gas bottle to make sure the high pressure side isn't leaking. As it's in the gas locker it's not such a safety issue but I once lost a full bottle overboard in about 2 weeks and they usually last me 6 months, so a small leak there can get quite expensive. You can also use a washing up liquid solution, but don't use it on other joints as it's corrosive. People say they wash it off afterwards but if a washing up liquid solution is drawn into a joint by capillary action, how would one know if it's been rinsed off properly inside, or if it's still sitting there attacking the olive? I'd rather spend a fiver on a can of non-corrosive leak detector spray.
    1 point
  49. I put the HE in series with the skin tank (before it, obviously). I also installed a HE bypass with a gate valve with the same diameter as the skin tank pipe, so if the valve is closed, all the coolant has to route through the HE. If the valve is open, the coolant can bypass the HE and there is no restriction. However in practice I have never had to open the HE bypass and that included Keadby to Torksey (Tidal Trent) at 2200rpm all the way (Beta 43) because the temperature gauge didn’t budge at all from its normal indication of around 75C. And that was with a rather undersized HE. With a larger HE there would be less restriction. So in reality I don’t think it’s an issue.
    1 point
  50. Tap connectors will be available to fit both heat exchanger and push fit. I put the pump in series with the eberspacher and it circulated fine. Perhaps best to take the electric feed to the pump off the ignition circuit to prevent leaving it on. It works well.
    1 point
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