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  1. The dominant group will always feel victimised by minorities doing things that don’t include them. Being pro gay isn’t anti straight. Just like being pro Black isn’t anti white. They feel left out. I call this a taste of their own medicine. A group of gays is seen as a slight to them in some way hence the need to say “why can’t you just do what the rest of us do” (aka conform and submit). We aren’t the rest of you. It is types like this who make us make a point of our differences. I recall once someone saying to me, as though I should take it as a compliment that “you’re not really super gay” as though being gay were a bad thing. I’d be happy never to mention who I sleep with or what I do behind closed doors ever again. I agree, I don’t think we are special. I have heterosexual friends and mix with them and never does who we sleep with come up in discussion (probably how many heterosexuals prefer it). But they understand and empathise with why I need to find others who are gay. Because guess what? Most people aren’t. I could misinterpret a situation with a man and end up in hospital or worse, dead. Attacks on gays are on the rise. I don’t attend Pride or get involved in the politics of the LGBT. But I don’t, continually, proclaim my lack of understanding of such things as though it contributes any value to the discussion which is being done in this very thread. Calls of “I don’t understand X, Y or Z” just highlights your ignorance. It is 2023. You have all the information at your finger tips. How about we drop the “I don’t understand why they congregate” façade and say what you really mean? Gays want to meet other gays and have sex, surprise surprise. Clutch your pearls elsewhere. It’s so bloody tiring. I hope OP does find other boat folk who are gay and gets a chance to connect with them. I know I’ve thought about it on my travels as a solo gay vagabond boater. Seeing a rainbow flag sticker in a boat window makes me relaxed because it signals to me they’re my sort. I know this may be novel to other people who dONt UnDeRstANd but it’s small gestures and signs like this that make me feel comfortable in a world that wants to shut me up, hide me away or, worse, blend in.
    26 points
  2. If you are travelling down to Uxbridge, I would recommend that you forget about using marinas to refuel and instead make use of the excellent fuel boats. These are operated by real enthusiasts, the majority of them on that stretch trading under the umbrella of "Jules Fuels" after Julia Cooke who started the business but is herself I gather Semi-retired, (not that that stopped Jules from refuelling our two boats at Braunston recently!) Different boats ply different stretches, but whether you encounter Ryan, Nick, Andrew or anybody else you wll get first rate service, and a decent price. Keep them trading - they can often get to you in poor conditions, when you would not ant to be venturing out yourself. They deserve our support!
    24 points
  3. Yesterday we handed over our beautiful boat to her new owners. A very sad day as I am not ready to accept that I am no longer a boater. Regretfully, busy jobs and increasingly frail, unwell and dependent parents meant that we were not going to be able to get away on the boat much (or for long periods as we have been), and we could not justify hanging on to such an expensive luxury if we weren't going to be able to make use of it. It is not an exaggeration to say that I have had the happiest times of my life on the boat and it has renewed my love and appreciation for the UK. I know the network is not perfect, and is in need of quite a bit of TLC, but I have enjoyed every single day of my boating life - have seen the most extraordinarily beautiful scenery and made some wonderful friends. Boating has enriched my soul like nothing else ever could and I am so grateful that I had the chance to experience it. Last month I celebrated the 10th anniversary of my bowel cancer diagnosis and I hope the next decade will see me back in my true home on the water. Hubby is giving the new owners a day of cruising/helming training today and if you see NB Aventine out and about with her new owners please make them feel welcome. I just wanted to say a big thank you to all on here for everything I have learnt about boats and boating.
    20 points
  4. Yes I read it - non-story the Daily Mail of the canal world. I'm also fed up with the CRT baiters in this forum. We're soon going to have a fight for the survival of the canal system and all some people want to do is pick holes whilst the whole edifice (the canals,not those running them) collapses. There you go, battle line drawn.
    19 points
  5. Just to make you aware that starting in October there will be a joint IWA & CRT offside vegetation cutting programme (all volunteers) on the T&M between Fradley Junction and Great Haywood, then down the S&W as far as Gailey. There will be another operation starting in Coventry and heading north to Hawkesbury, then to Fazeley then on the B&F to Curdworth. Obviously neither will require a stoppage (although there is one at the Great Haywood end of the S&W in January for weir maintenance), nor will there be any formal navigation restrictions in place. However if any of you are moored in those sections and hear the cutting being carried out approaching your boat, it would help a great deal if you would move forward or back briefly if asked to do so. Many of the spots with encroaching vegetation are opposite popular moorings so it’s in everyone’s interest if we can pay particular attention to dealing with those. As you all know, the encroaching vegetation on many parts of the system has been neglected and is probably the worst it’s been for years. Unfortunately in order to help catch up we need to make enough progress to complete the whole of those sections if possible, before we have to stop in early March when the wildlife begins nesting. We will be working Monday to Friday. We will therefore have to just concentrate on the significant places such as on bends, sightlines, opposite popular moorings, bridge and lock approaches, narrow sections etc, and on the straighter sections we will have to leave sporadic tree encroachments on the basis that if two boats meet, one will have to hold back briefly, and on some sections just create passing places. I also ask for you patience if you come across us and we are unable to move out of your way straight away. We are usually pretty good at doing this, but occasionally it may take a few minutes for us to tuck in out of your way. Afterwards you will no doubt see some places and wonder why we haven’t addressed them, but I’m afraid that in the circumstances this will be the best we can hope for, at least in the short term anyway. And it will certainly be much better than it is at the moment!
    18 points
  6. Our boat has been at Glascote Basin since last November where it is being repainted to a very high standard by the team at Norton Canes Boatbuilders with experienced supervision provided by Sarah Edgson. There is more information on our website here. We did start repainting 'Alnwick' in 2005 but for many reasons, progress slowed when we had completed the outside of the back cabin. By 2016, we decided that the paint we had purchased more than ten years earlier was by then too old to use!
    16 points
  7. It’s worth pointing out that not even 60 years ago—in my parents’ lifetime, in my lesbian aunts’ lifetime, maybe even in some of your lifetimes—heterosexuals put laws in place that would make me illegal. I could be punished, beaten and imprisoned. That isn’t ancient history. This still happens in some parts of the world. The reverberation of this regressive practice is still felt by people like me. It was your heterosexual police force who would entrap us like we were wild savages, they would raid our gathering spots, unable to leave us alone, veritably foaming at the mouth to oppress and subjugate. They would pretend to be like us so they could hurt us. Alan Turing helped Britain to win the Second World War and his reward from the heterosexual majority was castration. Truly and utterly shameful. It was this society where even popular homosexuals feared being themselves. Kenneth Williams, who the British public adored for his role in the Carry On films and Just a Minute, could never feel truly comfortable with himself because of the society he was born in, despite the deep public adoration for him and his talent. I posit his profound self-loathing was created by a society that hated who he really was and loved his created persona on stage and film. When we are told to just integrate, I dare say why don’t you lot make a society that is welcoming and caring for people like me so that this so-called integration is possible? Why is it incumbent upon me to do that? You create laws to criminalise me, you castrate me, you threaten and hurt me. What are you doing to help me integrate? Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.
    16 points
  8. Please put your dogs on a damn lead. As everyone is I'm sure aware a specific breed in in the news at the moment for attacking people. I don't think it's just a breed thing. My small boy (corgi) has been attacked 4 times in the past few months on the towpath or in a marina. He was just picked up and shaken by the back of the neck by a much larger dog, like a rabbit. Owner not in sight. If your dog is not extremely well trained, has poor recall or shows ANY aggression ever. Keep them on a damn lead when there is a chance to meet other dogs. Keep them in line of sight at all times. I keep mine on a lead because he does not always like other dogs. I can't do much if yours comes running over out of your control. I do not want to have to harm your dog to save mine. I have already had to kick several dogs in the head. These were not the stereotypical "aggressive" breeds. "He's usually friendly!" is not an excuse. I can't bear the thought on my lovely boy being seriously hurt by another dog: Edit: sorry if the wrong place to post this. Move it if needed!
    15 points
  9. 5. make it easier and cheaper for householders to dispose of their rubbish at the council "tips".
    15 points
  10. So yesterday I bought a steel Dutch cruiser, its a boaty boat rather than a corridor 🤣 I currently have a widebeam but I have lusted after this boat for a few years, it has a Sole 44 diesel engine with 146 hours on it. The previous to last owners can only be described as the artful Bodger! He didn't fix anything correctly ever!!!! The list of bodges he did are endless, as I sort them I will list them, i have fixed the water leak on the front hatch already. I only have until the end of may to do it as that's when the BSS runs out, pictures for perusal
    14 points
  11. Much like some of the posters in the original thread, which I have just read, I find this type of thread rather saddening. I have a longstanding interest in the history of canals, going back over 40yrs. I had Richard Dean's map of the BCN on the wall of my room at University, rather than the standard student posters, and still really enjoy poking around the backwaters of the BCN, have worked on restoration projects and I particularly like the quirky smaller boats - the tugs and the iceboats. I was therefore absolutely delighted when Oates came up for sale at a time and a price when we could take it on. Oates is a family boat. My wife, daughters and I all enjoy boating. We have a historic licence discount and as part of that I feel an obligation to take Oates to places where it helps form part of an attraction and allows other people to enjoy seeing it. We take it to Ellesmere Port, we went to the tug gathering and after the BCN Challenge we left it on the BCN for an extra couple of weeks so that we could take it to the Bradley festival, which had asked for historic boats which were available to attend (we were one of four). For reasons of travel logistics and mooring fees, going to Bradley actually cost more than the historic boat discount, but I don't mind that, it was good to take it to a worthwhile event. I don't deny enjoying being at these gatherings, but that isn't the only reason we go. We have set up an information board and usually spend quite a few hours standing by the boat, chatting to visitors about the boat and the engine, and if it ties in I am always happy to let people see it running, show the start-up procedure etc. At Ellesmere Port we have been up to the water point and it always gets a lot of extra interest from visitors to see a boat moving through the locks. Rather like some other short boats including Sickle, many people appear to assume that because the boat is short it is easy to manoeuvre and must be shallow drafted, but it isn't on either count. Being very deep, we do tend to create movement as we pass boats, but I take it slowly, although I don't always guess how long it will take to slow down correctly as it is dependent on channel depth. Mostly I get smiles, waves, nods and thumbs up from boats we are passing so people generally seem happy to see and hear us pass (they also talk to me but it is much louder on the stern than people realise and I can't usually hear what they are saying). As anyone who read my recent comment regarding previous experience with some historic boat owners would be aware, I have also experienced unpleasant behaviour. It is definitely not universal by a very long way, but it does exist, just as it does with all types of boat owner. We sometimes need to get on but that's not about being historic - for us, boating is restricted to outside school times so if we are on the boat for the weekend then we need to get somewhere specific to pick up a car and get the children home at a reasonable hour to get ready for school on Monday. The mindset which some people without time constraints have does not quite apply to us, but that has nothing to do with being historic. We are also pretty efficient with locks and swing bridges and we often catch someone else up on a flight and give them a hand. I have done the Wolverhampton 21 in 1hr 20mins in the past, with a crew of three, so when we came down a couple of weekends ago and the queue built up to four boats with us at the back, that was not ideal and it took nearly 3hrs, but we still got home at a fairly reasonable hour so no issues, but I will admit that I wasn't hanging about on the clear bits of the Shroppie. I can empathise with @beerbeerbeerbeerbeer's observations on comments about continuous cruisers. Just because you happen to have a particular type of boat or use it in a particular way does not automatically mean you conform to someone else's stereotype. Alec
    14 points
  12. There are countless incidents and issues reported upon regarding cycling on the towpaths, most of which are (often rightly) berating inconsiderate cyclists. Just now I'm on a water point with my hose crossing the towpath. I've just watch a cyclist travelling at pace see my hose, dismount and lift his bike over my hose before hopping back on and disappearing into the distance. I was unable to thank him for his actions as I was inboard so he was also unaware that his actions were witnessed, and he won't read this here, but credit where credit is due. I'm sure there are many cyclists like him who are sadly, like us boatists, let down by the few who stand out for the wrong reasons. It would be nice if consideration was the norm, but we shouldn't lose sight of the fact that perhaps it still is.
    14 points
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  14. Latest update: This weekend, with the help of a few friends I took the boat from Banbury to Napton to try reversing down the flight. It was dark when we arrived at lock 10, the lock where it got stuck. With the engine off and a bit of jiggling, a light flush from the top paddles, the boat passed through! So now I've made it through Napton! Hat tip to @magnetman, thanks for the tip sir... To everyone else that came with advice and positive words, thank you for your time and thoughts. Happy New Year to you all.
    14 points
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  18. Dear New Member. This is a subject that comes up regularly on this forum. For living on a narrowboat/widebeam on the English canals, there are many things to take into account, not least the cost. True, for the most part you will not pay full Council tax, but against that there will be higher fuel costs, both for moving and heating. The purchase price of a boat can be attractive, compared to a small house, 2nd hand boats are similar to 2nd hand cars, too cheap and you are buying someone elses troubles. Like cars they go down in value the longer you keep them. Unlike house, that go up! (selling a house to buy a boat, may mean you will never be able to afford a house again.) All canals and rivers are controlled by Navigation Authority's who have their rules and regulations to abide by. These you need to be aware of , for the area you wish to boat in. Living on a boat, on a permanent mooring needs Planning Permission from the local council, so true residential moorings are both rare and expensive, especially in towns. Living on a boat has to be a life-style choice, that all members of the household are happy with. Everything that comes into a house, gas, water, electricity, post, all has to be taken to the boat or generated on-board, likewise all that leaves the house, rubbish, sewage, has to be carried away. In both cases by the boater. Not generally a problem in the summer, but very very different in the winter. There are many more details that you as a "new to boating" person need to be aware of, but for now I'll stop. Bod. P.s. This forum has a fantastic range of knowledge, that most members willingly share, if you are asked a question, it will be to clarify what they need to know, in order to give correct advice. Also please come back regularly, some members are very quick to join a topic, less tham 5 minutes is not unknown.
    13 points
  19. Not just about faster trains, but to provide greater capacity to the transport network which is sorely needed, especially when personal transport options are being seriously curtailed and punitively charged.
    13 points
  20. So after saying we would not have another dog at our age......the house has been empty without a dog and this poor eight year old sweetie needed rescuing. So after donating lots of beer money to rescue centre here she is, we must be daft lol
    13 points
  21. So, finally, a sort of Post Script. Just ended my third straight week living aboard. All seems reasonably OK. Gone through my first Elsan clean out. Engine starts on demand. Sorted the leaky chimney stack - wood burner works beautifully. Hot water in the taps after the engine's been running a while. Slowly getting the hang of things. Leisure batteries are corpses I suspect. That's next on the list. Had my petrol generator stolen out of the front porch while I was aboard last night. I didn't hear a thing. My own fault for not chaining it to the boat. Another lesson learned. It was a small, relatively cheap thing, not a four figure priced one. Happy as a pig in muck, as the saying goes.
    13 points
  22. Welcome to the forum chris69, as you can see, canal/lock infrastructure isn't the only thing which is largely unchanged since the 18th century around here.
    13 points
  23. Dad recorded nearly all his voyages (mostly with mum, @1st ade and me) on a canal map mounted on pin board in his office ("den" would have been a better term) - each night afloat recorded with a pin - the map is still up, given interest in the history of holiday boating I thought some of you might enjoy it! After dad died, I realised his last holiday hadn't been recorded - We took him on a Bruce Trust boat on the K&A. So I added that one in white pins Edited add - drawing pins (except those at the corners of the plan!) who some of the places we took our car top dinghy - those were day trips
    13 points
  24. Hi all, I'd like to take a moment to formally welcome both 1st Ade and Jen-in-Wellies who joined the Moderator team as of late April this year. After a successful introductory period, I'm pleased to announce that both are happy to continue working alongside the rest of our much valued team. I'd also like to announce that Bigray, Liam, NB Lola and Wrigglefingers have stood down from the Moderator role. We also wish to extend our gratitude to them for their contribution and service over the years. Our Moderator team now consists of: 1st ade Athy Buccaneer66 Dave_P Jen-in-Wellies Magpie Patrick Our full staff list can be found on the page linked below: https://www.canalworld.net/forums/index.php?/staff/ Thank you Rich
    13 points
  25. Outside the Greyhound in 1968:-
    12 points
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  28. Hi all another painting by my Daughter who has done it for xmass for her mum and me painting and dog
    12 points
  29. 12 points
  30. As promised, here’s a little writeup of our week long trip on a Narrowboat with a 6 week old baby! There were 4 of us (My wife and I, my sister and her husband) and when we booked the trip we were unaware there would be a fifth guest! Trip was booked through Aqua Narrowboats on the Aqua Vida- would highly recommend them for anyone who is looking- great boats, nice location and brilliant staff. We collected the boat from Barton Turns Marina and, as advised by the friendly folk on here and the chap at the marina, took a right and headed SW awards Fradley Junction. Now for some baby stuff- our primary concern was sleeping arrangements. Justin from Aqua was very helpful and took the liberty of measuring the spaces next to & between beds so we could work out what she could sleep in- she’s a little small to be on her own in the Saloon. 58cm between the smaller double bed and the bulkhead was the magic number, and after a lot of digging found an ideal bed at Smyths Toys which worked a treat- easy to fold up and could disappear during the day. Beyond that, we bought her bouncing chair along with us too. It was a bit of faff moving bits around between day and night- our bed became the cot storage location during the day… but it was honestly fine. One of the saloon benches became a changing station as needed, but again, no real hassle. Baby is breasted, so we didn’t need to faff around with any bottles, sanitising etc- but I imagine that could be a bit tedious with the limited space. At that point she wasn’t bothered about dummies either, so we had no need for any sterilisation, but a lunchbox and Milton tabs would have sufficed if needed. First night we made it to Fradley junction end enjoyed a nice dinner in the Swan pub. We bought a very compact pram with us (Joolz AER+) which is fine from newborn onwards and folds up into a very small package- that lived in one of the cupboards near the back door of the boat. It was ideal for the short journeys to pubs etc and gave her somewhere to sleep while we ate. We also had a Tuya baby carrier with us which was very useful. Day 2, we stopped at the big Tesco in Rugely to stock up, then continued on to Great Haywood and had another nice dinner in the Clifford Arms. We also rescued an uninhabited boat that was blocking the canal… that was a bit of excitement for us! (The mooring rope had totally disintegrated, so I was pleased to see my knot still holding tight when we passed it again a couple of days later!). Day 3 bought us to Stone. We moored right outside of the big M&S (Near the winding hole) and marked our ‘turnaround’ point. For the life of me I cannot remember the name of it, but we found the most amazing Italian restaurant. Probably some of the best Italian food I’ve eaten in the UK, would HIGHLY recommend. Day 4 turned us around and we got back to Great Haywood, then continued along the Staffs & Worcester mooring opposite Stafford Boat Club. Lovely quiet place… can’t remember where we ate! On Day 5 we span around and headed back towards Great Haywood to go back onto the Trent & Mersey canal where we stopped just outside of Rugely for the night. There was an epic rainstorm just as we were getting towards the junction itself- and for anyone that’s been there you’ll know it’s very narrow and stopping isn’t an option… so that was fun! Day 6 took us on a leisurely trip to Alrewas where we stopped early in the day and visited a nice coffee shop, then had some food from the local takeaway fish & chip shop- would recommend! They had a great variety of food. That left us the short journey back towards the marina to reluctantly return the boat. We had a lovely, relaxing trip and in the same circumstances, I would absolutely do it again. In reality, I think we were at the perfect age window for the baby- even now she’s far too interested in things to want to laze around on a boat for days..! It does still remain the only time she’s slept all the way through the night though… I believe that was the case on 3 of our 7 nights, so that was a treat for us. The other couple on the boat were incredibly excited for the bonding time with baby and were well aware that there would be sleepless nights etc… in reality I think we have lucked out as she’s still not a particularly fussy baby. Mum had a wonderful week and was able to get some well deserved rest between feeds which I know she appreciated- there were plenty of naps happening throughout the week (For all 5 of us!). Not having to work meant I got to spend a lot of valuable time with her… plenty of photos of her in her carrier being worn by Captain Dad! We ate in pubs virtually every lunch & dinnertime, so that was pretty easy. Someone had mentioned breastfeeding in a pub may be an issue… if any other pubgoers had approached that subject I’d have (not very politely) told them where to shove it As expected though, it was a complete non-issue. All in all, a 10/10 week for us and we were able to create some lovely memories and take some great photos that she can look at when she’s older. Thanks all for the advice- it was all very welcome and extremely helpful!
    12 points
  31. Well said. I wasn't going to get involved in the thread because I'm not gay and I have no idea of any such community you asked about but because some of the prehistoric responses I thought it worth saying not everyone holds such views, good luck in finding what you are after. A fairly innocent question was responded to by some posters questioning his request which then led into an argument about his culture/lifestyle/life choices, are you surprised at a slightly defensive response, which as far as I can see contained no targeted attacks just an opinion on society in general
    12 points
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  33. I heard that the British summer is now to be renamed "Muslim summer". Partly Sunni but mostly Shi'ite.
    12 points
  34. Quite. I shall keep my boats and support the waterways until the bitter end. After all, there might not BE a 'bitter end'. I bet the canals are mostly still here in fifteen years, and all the same problems persist. And in the meantime, I'll have had fifteen more years of brilliant boating.
    12 points
  35. There appears to more and more people on the cut who are not that interested in boating and don't want to follow the simple rules. The cut is a lovely relaxed place with very few rules, and even those are a bit flexible, but when "boaters" push things too far it goes wrong, and is likely to go wrong for all of us. We now have thug looking baliffs strutting the towpath and helping to remove boats. CRT do not have the staff to enforce the rules against serious objectors and have already had a fatality, so if they decide to hand enforcement over to a private parking company, or even a security company, can we really blame them?. People like George and his supporters are going to make things worse for all of us.
    12 points
  36. Its a term often used now, and there are quite a few rich buggers on the cut including a fair few millionaires, but also a lot of working class boaters and an increasing amount of "lowlife". Anybody who things its a rich mans playground should visit a few boat clubs, these are an important part of the cut and not much talked about here but often the home of many working class boaters. Unlike salty sailing the canal is one of the few places where a working class bloke (or woman) can be the captain of his own ship, and this is yet another reason why the government should fund the canals.
    12 points
  37. It was originally built in sepia but converted to grayscale in the 60’s, it then became full colour in 1975. Sadly due to the lack of funding the colour palette has had to be removed and sold at auction to raise funds for a new Spectrum Manager to ensure the general public can look forward to a full colour canal in the future, possibly.
    11 points
  38. Thank you! Tatty Lucy won! Very pleased with results and big thanks to the crew including our girls who have to put up with my planning and early starts on the challenge! Lily (our 8 year old) is delighted with the result!
    11 points
  39. Absolutely do not buy a new boat for first. The confidence borne of ignorance is a massive factor in boating, and the evidence is to be found in sale yards across the system, at discount, waiting for the next inexperienced mistake-maker. I think it takes living on the boat for a winter to learn what you don't know at the outset, about living aboard, about boat designs, and the 'dream' which can so easily be the 'living nightmare'. In my case I learned that winter on the K&A in a narrowboat was pretty awful - claustrophobic, windy and wet, mud from the squelchy towpath, and every few days a cold and wet trip to refill with water. Roasting hot in the front saloon, and very cold in the back bedroom. Cramped conditions and too much time in the same tiny space is not a recipe for happy relationships either. Damp muddy clothes, muddy boots, muddy floor, mud everywhere - feeling more and more disconnected and alienated from the world in general and more and more like a vagrant. Of which there are no shortages on the cut. Not so good for mental health. What I learned is that I am not hardy enough to live aboard on the cut, and now I am a seasonal boater. Retaining some sort of land based accommodation is in my view vital - compromise on boat and land options to enable it, because the one-way jump from land to boat living might be a huge and irreversible mistake.
    11 points
  40. We have seen an increase in posts that have been complained about for personal attacks and insults on other members and/or the use of bad language. The moderators would like to remind all members of the forum Rules and Guidelines. They are there to make the forum a pleasant place to be for all its users. There are a couple of sentences in the Ethos section we would like to draw your attention to. So, no personal attacks on other members. No matter how upset you've got. This should go without saying. On bad language, if you can say something without using it, then do so. Different people have different tolerances for different words and what may to you seem a perfectly fine thing to say will not be for others. The moderators have a liking for OFCOM's research on acceptable language in broadcasting. This is based on a lot of research they have carried out in the UK on what most people currently find acceptable and what they do not. It covers not only swearing, but derogatory terms on race, politics, mental health, sexuality, disability and so on. CWDF is not a broadcaster and not covered by OFCOM, but we have found their guide to be a good basis to work to. We don't want to see any of the words in the severe category. We probably won't allow any word in the medium category. The mild category should be necessary and appropriate to the discussion, but try and avoid if you can. You'll almost certainly be able to make your point without using it. If in doubt about a word, don't use it. Up to now we have been bowdlerising reported bad language. We have the option to use further sanctions for repeat offenders. It's something we take seriously. Don't rile up the Mods!
    11 points
  41. Tunnel bands is a modern term for them. Since the 60s, I’ve always known them as counter bands. I don’t think the waterways press help in this respect, I’ve seen what I know as a stop beam referred to as a “ boatman’s beam” , likewise a cabin stool called a “ boatman’s stool”. Side doors called swan or duck hatches make me wince….
    11 points
  42. With the caviat that I know nothing about your situation, nor is it my business, I am with Dave on this one. My wife was fine one minute and then, over a weekend, she went down with a brain infection. By the Tuesday after she was hospitalised. This was followed by a rapid issuing of a Section 28 order due to her increasing irrationality and paranoia and her incarceration in a secure hospital for her own safety. In her mind she was having hallucinations, hearing voices and was generally terrified of everything. At one point, after weeks of this, she asked me to euthanise her as she felt she could not go on. Eventually the trick cyclists fixed her and eight years on she is fine, albeit a very changed person. She is on lots of meds and has the occasional relapse but instantly picks up on it and refers herself to the quacks. Only once have we had to return to the secure hospital. We binned the boat buying fund which meant I could stop work to care for her. The point is none of this matters. We still love each other and will continue to do so whatever life bungs at us. We have a very up front relationship and talk regularly about the current problem whatever that is. It may be my turn to wobble next. Who cares. We continue to putter along as a couple making the best of life. Our revenge is to be happy and content with whatever hand we are dealt. We hire a boat when we can and do short trips. When she gets tired we stop. We still enjoy our boating when possible. Team X may not be the most dynamic any more but we are determined to be the most happy.
    11 points
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  44. I first saw the Swansea Canal about fifty years ago, sometime after a short section had been filled in for a council Depot in Clydach. The first picture about ten years ago of my then car parked in the by-now-closed depot. On Friday last (6th) the scene looked like this.... And then shortley afterwards the local MP cut the tape which lifted the stop plank which let the water in... Until a little while later the new bit looked like this... This is phase one, it's only half width as the pipe carrying water for the Mond is under the other half, the plan is that water will be diverted via this new bit allowing the pipe to be removed and the canal widened - and when that happens the lock, buried under the site, can be dug out and restored... To wrap it all up there was cake...
    11 points
  45. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  46. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  47. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  48. The inland waterways network is a fabulous asset. It is integral to the very landscape, history, and indeed to the function, of its surrounding lands. It has ongoing functions that are purely utilitarian, such as drainage, micromobility corridors, and increasingly importantly, global warming mitigation. To this can be added the originally unintended function as a place to locate moveable housing. But the navigable waterways also provides the space and enabling for a very wide range of recreational and educational opportunities, as well as significant wildlife refuges. And then there are the aesthetics. Working waterways are true eye candy, as much in busy city centres, as in remote Yorkshire Moors and Lincolnshire fens. They are a defining elemment of so many of Great Britain's landscapes, and a very important link to it's past. They are internationally significant. It would be a national tragedy, and extremly irresponsible to restart the decline of the waterways experienced at the mid of last century. The physical assets were still very largely functional when we sold our boat five years ago. The frontline staff that we encountered from EA and CART were generally good. Unfortunately though, I could not say that about the either the very structure of their administration, or the legislation that they operate under. CART's structure, as a charity is very largely dependant on ad hoc and annual donations, I rate the government grant's, as really just donations. As such it's income is highly dependant on the financial health of it's donors which has little relationship with the waterways maintenance needs. Structural degradation does not slow down to match budget reductions. The Waterways Acts are somewhat archaic reflective of bygone uses, primarily facilitating commercial boating, and have inadequate provision for coping with current largely unsanctioned demands to provide spaces for floating houses. There also seems to inadequate provision for integration of some functions with the surrounding local authorities. Unfortunately all this suggests that the solutions are ultimately very largely political. But, take heart there is a precedence for this. The waterways renaissance last century was initiated at grass roots level. A huge amount of volunteer hard work, a lot not officially sanctioned, coupled with old fashioned political activism. This pushed it upwards, and kept it there until it did indeed become a political issue. If it was done before, why not again? Currenntly there is a huge amount of volunteer engagement, in both keeping the existing system functioning, and working towards restoring further waterways to navigable status. It would be a massive shame if this effort goes to waste, for the lack of will to elevate the matter back into the political arena, and keep it there until something gets done. Good luck
    11 points
  49. I feel that supporting organisations that are trying to stop our waterways closing down is enough
    11 points
  50. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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