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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/06/20 in all areas

  1. May I suggest that you don't need half the pieces of equipment you have on your boats. However, personally I wouldn't feel the need to be as judgemental as you're being and slag you off for having them. Just because one has a bow thruster doesn't necessarily make one reliant upon it. It really depends on how it is used. I can steer my boat perfectly well with or without the BT but it is nice to have for reversing long distances and for close quarters handling around GRP boats for example. By the way, in 15 years on this boat my BT batteries have never gone flat. In answ
    4 points
  2. I have just looked in unbelieving horror as a boy aged about 12 got off a hire boat that was coming up through Hillmorton bottom lock carrying two bags of rubbish and ignoring the bins, threw them both into an attractive flowerbed on private property and ran back to what I guessed were his parents. All looked well dressed respectable intelligent people. I carefully picked the bags out of the flowers and put them in the Biffa skip provided by CRT. I then telephoned the Hire Company whose management promised to speak to them harshly. It's getting worse isn't it? Or is it just me ge
    3 points
  3. You said: They are a useful accessory for newcomers to assist in mooring with a strong wind, but you become addicted..., which sounds a lot more absolutist than it's easy to become addicted. You're backtracking a little. I don't think your suggestion is necessarily as reasonable as you think. Some people with BTs hardly use them so you wouldn't notice. Don't automatically assume that if you don't hear a BT the boat hasn't got one Anyway, it does get boring when someone comes on with a question and it immediately descends into the same old nonsense.
    3 points
  4. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  5. It would be more sense to lobby for the removal of the booking system completely. If you turn up and there is no room tough
    2 points
  6. Its not a crime to be an a***hole, if it was the police would be even more overworked and the prisons would be bursting. As for the end product of parenting its easy, I just tried to make them turn out like an even better version of me 🙂. I suppose thats the problem, the a***holes just produce lots of little a****holes, or maybe lots of even bigger a****holes. ...............Dave
    2 points
  7. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  8. That's not subtle enough. A blast of reverse and forward to suck the water out from under them and then replace it is much better as there is no contact.
    2 points
  9. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  10. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  11. Daft idea just to save the cost of a VSR. The day you have an engine problem necessitating much cranking you will regret this system. Why try to be different? Why do you think everyone else has a seperate battery? Because its sensible. Just have a small 80Ah start battery charged by a VSR and you have no worries,
    2 points
  12. Narrowboats are so popular down south 'cause you can cruise all the English and Welsh connected system. The narrow canals of the midlands split the wide canals in to a number of zones, with no easy way to move from one to another. The Scottish canals were all built sensibly wide, so no need for the compromises of a narrowboat, unless you enjoy walking like an ancient Egyptian! Jen (with a narrowboat!)
    2 points
  13. Alan, I've tried but can't resist it. PLEASE take this comment as humorous rather than critical. "and as the roar of 1/4 million gallons of water hurling over the weir grows even louder she raises her voice to be heard... 'step 14! Attach left end of roll bar 'D; to port side Fluke 'F' using M10 x 25 bolt 'K''
    2 points
  14. Perhaps you could, should, would be the one to get him some help for his own good before some big guy puts him and his generators out of action permanently? I have had 3 such stroppy boaters, one finished up in the cells for a night for threatening me whilst I was phoning the police who heard him say he was going to sort me out (good luck there, I've been trying for years) , one attacked me and the police took him away and one was found dead in his boat some time later. ( no, not me. I leave them still breathing, just) Yes report, name and shame, tell everyone, y
    2 points
  15. If they weren't Purdy then they weren't the best in the business
    1 point
  16. ....not sure......😊
    1 point
  17. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  18. The best thing the hire company could do is send £20 to canalboat for cleaning up after them and tell the hirers that it's been knocked off their deposit as a cleaning fee.
    1 point
  19. Three way fridge (if you can still get them) is a NoNo. Potentially dangerous on gas, eats lot of electricity whether on shoreline or not. If the thought of a BIG battery bank fills you with horror - then mebe a 12V fridge would do, but they're expensive and not of the best quality. As Uncle Tim will probably say put in a 240V one and a decent battery bank plus a good inverter and relax...
    1 point
  20. That was the status quo, it has worked fine for many years, I see this as the creeping progress towards charging for navigation rights that we are entitled to.
    1 point
  21. Probably in the lock at Sileby if I know Matty 😎
    1 point
  22. Another advantage of a smaller, separate cranking battery is that when it goes flat (eg lack of use during lockdown) you can more easily take it out to use a domestic (car) battery charger. Don't ask me why I think this is a good idea, but when the battery gets a bit knackered (and it will do, sooner or later) it saves a lot of mither.
    1 point
  23. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  24. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  25. I won't be doing anything like that 😁 but I can think of a few characters who definitely would think of something to do to his boat. I've moved now. Hopefully I won't encounter the guy again. I doubt he'll be the last knobhead I'll see on my travels sadly.
    1 point
  26. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  27. I should probably point out that I'm currently in Cambridge and the boat is moored in London. We're trying to finish up work commitments, sell all our belongings etc, with a view to us moving on to the boat towards the end of September, which is when I'll be free full time to begin to properly understand what's going on. So it's going to be a while before I can do what you suggest - which I'm absolutely keen to do - as I said in the intro thread I've got some savings and am planning to give myself a year to become boat savvy before deciding if and how we want to make living aboard our life.
    1 point
  28. They used to publish a Nicholsons for the Broads and Fens. Mine (bought second hand) is dated 1986, but not much if waterways importance has changed. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ordnance-Survey-Guide-Broads-Fens/dp/0905522974 MP.
    1 point
  29. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  30. Slightly off topic. Do you know why elephants have big ears? 'Cos Noddy wouldn't pay the ransom.
    1 point
  31. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  32. Hi Bod. What a lovely keepsake. The main thing you need to keep the doll away from is sunlight. The UV degrades the plastic making it go hard and brittle and also will degrade the pigments especially the red. Keeping it above freezing is probalby also a good idea. I guess it is made from plasticised PVC. I would wrap it in cloth and then in a box well out of the sunlight. Should survive 2 years without any degradation.
    1 point
  33. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  34. https://www.johnbarnard.biz/tips-tricks-videos/ You could do worse than watch a few of these.
    1 point
  35. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  36. Thank you - I should have made that clearer. And the numbers that are underlined are negative, so the 2 at Nelson Dockyard would be 1.13 above water level at low tide (0.83-2) and a depth of 4.9 metres at high tide (using the same example). Variances to the projected level of half a metre are commonplace - VTS tell you this every 30 minutes, not that it should matter much to a narrowboat skipper!
    1 point
  37. A starter battery is another form of insurance, I doubt your boat will catch fire or sink during the next 12 months, so why buy insurance? Because if/when disaster happens you will realise why everyone else does.............
    1 point
  38. On this day 2017. Grounded ship on the Trent being rescued. https://www.facebook.com/100008544101828/videos/1698918590402928/ Also on this day 2017. Fulbourne in Lincoln
    1 point
  39. Report to CRT. Do not tell him you are doing so ( obvious I know) .Make notes of anything said or done to you. If his gennies are running until midnight then note the actual time they were switched off Have you any dealings with this person before, is there a history? You cannot use hearsay evidence if you report him to the police, however should the situation arise and you need to dial three nines please ensure that you mention the fact that you are a lone female and you fear for your safety. Mention what you know from others. But be prepared for them to also advise yo
    1 point
  40. I've lived aboard for 7 years, no mooring, 35ft boat. My total costs average a shade short of £2K a year. This includes a top end engine rebuild, 2 sets of batteries that I knackered because I didn't understand how to charge them properly, installation of solar panels, a full repaint and re fit of living area. All apart from the rebuild done by myself. I don't cruise too much, range around 50 miles a year. The keys to keeping costs down are a good solar array, a small genny that isn't thirsty for the winter months. A gas fridge costs £25 a month to run but I reckon that's cheaper than replacin
    1 point
  41. I said I was going to move. The only advice I asked for was opinions on whether it's worth talking to CRT.
    1 point
  42. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  43. If you can get the old pieces out and have some new pieces cut, then fit them yourself - the cost won't be that much. Other's labour will always make the cost look bad. The best other necessity is to stop the wood getting wet and seal properly..., to avoid the problem reoccurring down the line.
    1 point
  44. How good to see somebody getting some actual help with a bowthruster rather than the forum 'elders' questioning the wisdom of the first time poster who asked for help with theirs earlier today.
    1 point
  45. May I suggest that you actually go on a course and learn how to helm a boat - otherwise you will become reliant on the 'sissy-button' and the very time you REALLY need it, the battery will be flat and you will have no idea how to actually steer. They are a useful accessory for newcomers to assist in mooring with a strong wind, but you become addicted and you can hear them coming from miles away as they are used to try and stay in a straight line on a straight piece of waterway, YES, you can handle a widebeam without a bow thruster, it just takes practice. I current
    1 point
  46. Me too, but that's all it is, a dream.
    1 point
  47. is it so wrong i have dreams about a nicely painted engine bay?
    1 point
  48. Hobbits for engine room painting appear to be in short supply. Cruising the Cut in one his vlogs dealt with this by having his engine lifted out by a boat yard. Superficially it seemed a bit extreme, but the more I think about it the more sensible it seems - a case of do it once and do it well.
    1 point
  49. See the hints and tips page on the craftmaster website if you are considering the traditional coach painting route, a good summary of the various elements of the whole process. Others will advise various short cuts depending on the results you wish to achieve. On something the size of a narrowboat then get to know which power tools you will need to save time and elbow grease (eg angle grinder with clean and strip discs for rust, and RO sander for dealing with painting large panel areas, are typical minimum to save a lot of time) Most paints are british standard colours, but they all fade.
    1 point
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