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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/02/19 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    N.B. Elizabeth Hello, I’m Jim’s wife and after reading some of these comments on here I thought I had better put the record straight. Elizabeth is on the market because Jim has Alzheimer’s, and is now unable to lavish the care on her he once did. How do you put a price on the oldest surviving conversion of a narrowboat? we asked many people, some who worked with historic boats and some who owned them, everyone gave vastly different answers! we originally priced her at 60k to try to avoid her becoming a cheap live aboard, (Jim lived on her full time for 32 years, so nothing against live aboards) the price was always negotiable. We included the fact that she needs to be regularly maintained because with 83 year old wooden cabin she does! Foolishly we waited a year for a certain boat museum to get funding together to purchase her for their collection, as she is such an important boat, due to certain issues within their hierarchy we are still waiting and have frankly given up. Elizabeth has just been surveyed and the hull and engine are in very good order, her top is showing wear and tear but nothing that a little tlc can’t put right. We really hope that whoever purchases her will carry on caring for her the way Jim has over the last 53 years, she really is the most incredible vessel and I can guarantee the new custodians will never be short of conversation, because Elizabeth attracts attention wherever she goes. Annie
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  6. 3 points
    Turn off the mains and take that cover off (last photo) and you will find one or even two thermostats inside it, one will have the adjustable dial for temperature. Try turning it up a bit. If you need to change the thermostat then get the proper spanner and a spare gasket or two. ................Dave
  7. 3 points
    Catch up - answers above. I'm here to attempt to track a boat for a friend two months after it was stolen, long shot as it may be. Your suspicions aren't really relevant to the matter. If the post is annoying you, maybe move along to something more satisfying.
  8. 2 points
    You get the tank good and hot then just try to crack the nut, no more, once it moves drain the water down a bit. If you do it with the water pump off and open a hot tap there wont be any pressure in there. The water gives the cylinder both weight and rigidity
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  13. 2 points
    I sent an email complete with a photo and details of the green house type heaters I would be using to my insurers and they confirmed they are safe to use would not invalidate my policy.
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  15. 2 points
    A tubular or box spanner is a better bet, but if using one like David suggests, put two on at once, with the handles opposite each other. This balances the thrusts so there is only twisting force on the immersion and enables you to easily apply both hands to the job so applying most force. From your pictures the existing heater looks well scaled in! N
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  21. 2 points
    I wouldn’t have though that taking the battery up to a high SoC would increase imbalance, but it certainly shows it up more. I think it is true that high SoC is not good for longevity. But then when the batteries are likely to outlive their owners, does it matter? And as you’ve mentioned, it is perhaps keeping at 100% for long periods that is problematic, rather than charging to 100% and then immediately starting to discharge. I notice that with the latest version of iOS for my iPhone, they’ve introduced a thing called “optimised battery charging” which aims to charge only to 80% until shortly before you need it, by learning your charging routine. So in my case I plug the phone in when I go to bed around midnight, and get up around 8am. So the phone will charge to 80% between midnight and 1am, hold at 80% until 7am, then charge the last 20% in time for me to get up. Well something like that, I haven’t woken up in the middle of the night to check it! And of course those are lithium polymer batteries. So for my system I propose a selector knob, 50%, 80%, 100% or whatever. Normally left on 80% but if full capacity needed, switch can be moved to 100% an hour or so before end of cruising day. Or set it to 50% if arriving at the marina to leave the boat for a few weeks.
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  23. 2 points
    You can certainly have a guess, but since I'm not seriously looking until Spring, it wouldn't be the best use of your time. I don't disagree; they should but they're not compelled to do so. A naive/ romantic purchaser may not appreciate the need to be asking/ checking for such history/ documentation.
  24. 2 points
    I'm not sure if the OP is living aboard or not? I wouldn't assume anything. I have foam/ply porthole bungs. I never touch the Morco flue and don't bother blocking vents anymore. The boat could freeze in 2-3 days if the temp gets low enough but keeping the boat ventilated and above 5C is better if you're a liveaboard and away for a few days. Anyway, I've been doing it my way for 15 years without a problem so I'll just carry on. Yes, if you don't have shore power forget about using an electric oil filled rad.
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  26. 2 points
    Because you signed it.
  27. 2 points
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  29. 1 point
    It's downstream from Nottingham we want to go. Will see how much it's dropped on Wednesday before deciding. Still be a good flow on though.
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  33. 1 point
    For those interested CRT have today opened Cranfleet flood gates. However the Trent has still go a relatively high flow so procede with caution. If going upstream from Beeston to Cranfleet remember that there is a narrowing of the river below Cranfleet where the current speed increase so don't thrash your engine and have some power in hand. On our boat it takes an increase of between 500 and 750 rpm to maintain the same cruising speed through the narrowing. Above all else boat safely.
  34. 1 point
    To EVERYBODY OUT THERE with a sump box: If it doesn't work BIN IT AND FIT A GULPER. If it does work BIN IT AND FIT A GULPER. If you don't know what you've got, check it now and if you've got a sump box: BIN IT AND FIT A GULPER How do I get it to display in flashing red?
  35. 1 point
    No, it's not - you'll make the damned thing lazy! Just wait til you want to get away fairly early one morning only to find the damned thing is having a lie in. It'll end in tears I tell ye!
  36. 1 point
    The inside of the cover should look something like this: The blue bit is the end of the thermostat and it slides into a pocket. It is only held in by the wires so is easy to change. Try turning it up a bit. If that doesn't work they're only a few quid from Screwfix to replace, just get one the right length. Martin/
  37. 1 point
    As many car owners failed to do in my youth
  38. 1 point
    Alrewas one boat and Fazeley one boat. Do CRT purposely put them in unuseful places. The Fazeley one if you want water you have to go an hour and a quarter north, wind and then an hour and a half south. Had they been between the winding holes it would made much more sense. The one at Alrewas is above Bagnal lock so its to Fradley up three locks wind and return. If they had have been below the locks then they could use the waterpoints in Alrewas. The year before last Rugeley had them north of the aqueduct, mile out of town and Gt Haywood being the nearest water point
  39. 1 point
    I was going to suggest that, before I got to the end of the thread. Many years ago, I worked for Remploy who at the time were the biggest supplying manufacturers of heating elements in the UK. The predominant cause of low water temperature was nearly always found to be lime scale build up, or "furring" as it is often known, caused by what our Service Manager always referred to as "Agressive Water!! in other words, a high content if lime in the water. There is no point in trying to remove the limescale, as it will have damaged the element's thin copper cladding. To remove the heater you need a special Immersion Heater spanner, and a lot of elbow grease. Turn the power supply off, remove the dust cover, and disconnect the supply wires, then using as much force as needed unscrew the element from the tank. This can be a challenge with standard old fashioned copper tanks, which can buckle onder the starin of the spanner action, but marine calorifiers are far more robustly built so damage shoud not be an issue. Spanners can be ontained from places like Screwfix for less than £3.00
  40. 1 point
    Yes, I agree with you here. Nick seems to be taking the approach that taking the system to 95% ( ie just up to the knee) is optimum for his needs - with one of the benefits that you have more capacity. Sure it will reduce battery life time but is that significant? My viewpoint (but only relevant for me and you) is that you loose very little only going to 80% and it prolongs battery life. Now I dont know if that is going to be 1 year, 2 years, 5 years or 15 years...but it would be signifcant if holding below 80% doubles life. It may well do. I dont find capacity an issue as in the summer we can go 4-5 days without a charge with solar and in the winter when out and about we run the engine for a hour minimum to heat the water each day so we can park up for a few days without extra charging. The big plus of 80% ish max is that I know I am many hours from the 'full' with solar blasting power in so very unlikely to get up to the knee if something goes wrong. Its just that extra layer of safety. Also, one point that is not mentioned much on here, is the safety issue of Li's. Now we all say that it is very difficult to destroy an LiFePO4 battery (safer than all the other Li's) but the risk of damage to the surroundings is significantly higher on a 100% full battery compared to a lower charged battery in the event of a thermal runaway. The company I am involved with in Scotland are doing a project with a big Eu Aerospace company (EU grant funded) on packaging standards for air transportation of lithium batteries. We have been testing loads of cells to destruction at different states of charge. I must try and get a couple of videos to post but once you get a thermal runaway going on the worst type of Li, the effects are spectacular when 100% SoC compared to 30% SoC. I will say that it is very difficult to actually get a thermal runaway going - ie a blow lamp is not good enough (!) so we can all sleep safe in our beds - especially when our batteries are under the bed. They've not tried any LiFePO4s yet but I will get them to look at them. Bottom line is charging to 80% is safer than 100% but I havent got the data to compare the risks. In any risk study you need to consider the likelyhood of the risk occuring and the effect of that risk. Obviously the effect of 100% charge will be greater than 80% charge (ie a bigger explosion) but the likelyhood is also bigger as the voltages will be higher and thermal runaways (very unlikely on LiFePO4s) are likely to be caused by pin point temperature rises deep in the batteries ie cells shorting out and I assume this is more likely to happen as cell voltages reach 3.6V etc but I may be wrong. I will try and get chapter and verse of the boys in the lab and report back. I dont think all this talk of safety should sway anyone from getting LiFePO4s 'cause LAs are just as bad (lots of hydrogen around!) but you are one level of safety better if you are away from 100% with more time to react. I only ever take mine to 95% when I am there, paying close attention and ready to turn off the charge if I see a 'bad' change in voltage. eta. Just read Nicks response on having multiple target levels for charge. I like it.
  41. 1 point
    Yup, remove the grey cover (disconnect from power first) and take another photo of what’s inside.
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  43. 1 point
    More likely that the thermostat needs adjusting or replacing if the water gets warmish. Is it the usual domestic arrangement coaxial with the heater or a separate unit?
  44. 1 point
    The whole 80% vs 95% argument has not really been well discussed on any of the forums. Obviously you get better life time if you avoid 100% and maybe 95% but are there any other benefits of keeping lower than 90%? I get the impression (ie no specific data to quote) that cells go out of balance more if you are pushing to the top of the charge curve so by keeping down at 80% the cells stay in balance longer. This is not going to be a problem if you have a good cell balancing system. Are there any issues over the 'memory' effect? I know MP spent a lot of time up near 100% this summer. The rest of us seem to be operating much lower. One benefit of having an upper limit of 80% is that you are that much further away from destruction caused by overcharging so it is far less likely to happen! On my system I have a number of levels of security ie 2 separate audible alarms and 2 separate relay disconnects (but both to just one switch) but the 80% 'normal' termination keeps me further from trouble. I notice Tesla have 80% as the 'default' charging maximum.....but is that just to maximise battery life which is important in an EV?
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
    Yes that's right but you didn't assume it, I stated it in my previous post.
  47. 1 point
    There's a huge amount of speculation on this thread of what has happened to my friends boat. I won't engage in speculation as it doesn't help. I prefer to focus on the purpose of my post which is to locate my friends' stolen boat; share relevant info, and hope to hear from anyone who may have spotted it. My friend understands its a long shot so long after it was taken, but one worth attempting all the same. It costs nothing to ask. Thanks very much, I will pass the message on. I don't know Leon but my friend might since he lived on this boat for the last circa 8yrs on these waterways (even if moored in Nton for last couple of years). Cheers
  48. 1 point
    Make sure the bilges are empty and any auto pumps set to off. The Scout church parade in Blisworth one Sunday many years ago were the unfortunate recipients of the contents of my bilges as the lorry swung round the corner and the "water" piled up and set the auto pump running. N
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  50. 1 point
    All done. Chuffed to bits. Both cold and hot water runs okay and the pump runs for approximately 4-5 seconds after tap turned off. The power lead on the tyre pump was, believe it or not about a foot short. So after another walk to Midland Chandlers for some 12v cable and a bit of wiring genius all works. Amazing. Thanks so much for everyone's patience and advice. I really ought to have more confidence in myself. Always used to have when I was a whizz kid in management.
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