Jump to content


Photo

breaking down oil


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 lexicon

lexicon

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 727 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:high wycombe
  • Boat Name:lexicon

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:06 PM

hi folks

need to tap the collective experience of the forum.

having got oil in the bottom of my bilges after a gearbox issue and spillage while replacing the gearbox oil.

also got a fair bit of water in from deck boards and have a oil/water mix,

what is the best way/thing to use to break up the oil so i can safely empty the bilges and clean up?
  • 0
The narrowboat fit out estimator.

Take the time you think the job will take and treble it.
Take the cost you think it will be in pounds and double it.

Then add 10% and your getting close.

#2 RLWP

RLWP

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,553 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kenilworth
  • Boat Name:Tawny Owl

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:07 PM

You are supposed to remove the oil/water mix and dispose of it. I have been asked about that at two BSS test

Richard
  • 0

Primrose Engineering @Primroseeng

 

Until Dan gets his act together, you can donate to the running costs of the CanalWorld forum via Paypal using the button at the bottom of this page:  btn_donate_LG.gif


#3 Monkey 1

Monkey 1

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:10 PM

I guess the best way is to mop it out into a suitable container & take it to the local tip. Ours has a large tank for pouring old oil.
  • 0
"What value is material comfort, if the price is your freedom"

#4 lexicon

lexicon

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 727 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:high wycombe
  • Boat Name:lexicon

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:12 PM

Thats part of the problem

I originally got rid of the oil/water in a drum to the local tip but ended up with a residue at the bottom of the engine bay that as soon as water gets in im back to square one.
is there some way of cleaning the residue off?

im happy to dispose of the broken up/rinsed mix to the tip.
  • 0
The narrowboat fit out estimator.

Take the time you think the job will take and treble it.
Take the cost you think it will be in pounds and double it.

Then add 10% and your getting close.

#5 cereal tiller

cereal tiller

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,328 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:19 PM

Thats part of the problem

I originally got rid of the oil/water in a drum to the local tip but ended up with a residue at the bottom of the engine bay that as soon as water gets in im back to square one.
is there some way of cleaning the residue off?

im happy to dispose of the broken up/rinsed mix to the tip.

wood shavings,pour them in ,soak up and brush them/hoover them out.

then burn,no worse than a diesel stove?
  • 0

#6 Ex- Member

Ex- Member

    Long Standing Member

  • Ex-Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,556 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:20 PM

hi folks

need to tap the collective experience of the forum.

having got oil in the bottom of my bilges after a gearbox issue and spillage while replacing the gearbox oil.

also got a fair bit of water in from deck boards and have a oil/water mix,

what is the best way/thing to use to break up the oil so i can safely empty the bilges and clean up?


I prefer to use sawdust/wood shavings. Get out what liquids you can by scoop or suction then let sawdust do the rest, throw loads in the bilge, stir it all up so it gets to all the liquid, then let it dry out a bit, if it's still fairly wet for hoovering just add more until it's fluffy and moist only, then hoover the lot up. This way you don't need to break up the oil and you can burn off the shavings or dispose of them. Bedding sawdust for small animals is best, get it from TESCO ASDA etc compacted in bags and cheap as chips.

A Pela pump is brilliant for this kind of thing and worth investing in if you don't already have one.



  • 0

#7 Tonka

Tonka

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Surrey

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:21 PM

Used to a product called Bilgex
  • 0

#8 Monkey 1

Monkey 1

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:21 PM

The sawdust idea sounds a good one, never thought of that Posted Image

I'm kind of in the same boat to be honest. the metalwork feels greasy & when it rains the water looks a bit oily. I have just bought some gunk engine degreaser to spray around & then wipe it up with lots of old cloths. with a bit of luck it'll clean up most of it. I'm gonna wait until the weather improves first though. Fairy liquid is quite a good degreaser too but you need to wash it off when you've finished though as it promotes rust.

Edited by Monkey 1, 02 May 2012 - 05:24 PM.

  • 0
"What value is material comfort, if the price is your freedom"

#9 Grace & Favour

Grace & Favour

    Long Standing Member

  • Site Crew
  • 8,437 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:23 PM

Depending upon how much liquid you have there . . .

I'd strongly suggest you take the oil off the surface using an oil-pad(s) (available from Chandleries - or - even better - from an Auto wholesaler like Partco (every town has similar)

Or a loose oil-preferring loose absorbent such as Isol8 (also at Partco / Browns etc)

(the latter is also damnably good at getting rid of all household oils / cooking oil etc

I like collecting recipes

I now have a greater number of recipes than the likely number of days remaining to me!

 

 

Don't waste time thinking about what's wrong with yourself. Instead, focus on what's wrong with other people.


#10 Timleech

Timleech

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,242 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NW England
  • Boat Name:Barnabas Hedley

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:23 PM

Oil-only absorbent mats are pretty good, socks might be better if the volume is large.

Tim
  • 0

#11 lexicon

lexicon

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 727 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:high wycombe
  • Boat Name:lexicon

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:25 PM

wood shavings,pour them in ,soak up and brush them/hoover them out.

then burn,no worse than a diesel stove?



thats a great idea, i have a cabin full of sawdust from making the hatch, so i shall hoover up then empty hoover into the bilge once its nearly empty of liqiud :)
  • 0
The narrowboat fit out estimator.

Take the time you think the job will take and treble it.
Take the cost you think it will be in pounds and double it.

Then add 10% and your getting close.

#12 Tony Brooks

Tony Brooks

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,773 posts
  • Boat Name:JennyB

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:26 PM

Thats part of the problem

I originally got rid of the oil/water in a drum to the local tip but ended up with a residue at the bottom of the engine bay that as soon as water gets in im back to square one.
is there some way of cleaning the residue off?

im happy to dispose of the broken up/rinsed mix to the tip.



White bilge/pig blankest or socks normally absorb water but not oil so when I am in that situation I usually put one either side of the engine beds and leave them to"skim" the oil from the water.
  • 0
Tony Brooks

www.TB-Training.co.uk

Mechanical & electrical support for ordinary boaters

#13 Ex- Member

Ex- Member

    Long Standing Member

  • Ex-Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,556 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:30 PM

The sawdust idea sounds a good one, never thought of that Posted Image

I'm kind of in the same boat to be honest. the metalwork feels greasy & when it rains the water looks a bit oily. I have just bought some gunk engine degreaser to spray around & then wipe it up with lots of old cloths. with a bit of luck it'll clean up most of it. I'm gonna wait until the weather improves first though. Fairy liquid is quite a good degreaser too but you need to wash it off when you've finished though as it promotes rust.



If you're using Gunk, it's a degreaser anyway. Using detergents is a waste of time and money, all you're doing is bulking up the mess and adding more chemicals. Garages and the like have used sawdust for donkeys years and still do because it works best being very absorbent cheap and disposable and easy to clear up with a hoover, leaves bilges spotlessly clean if you scoosh it around enough.

KISS


  • 0

#14 boots

boots

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 509 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Boat Name:Phoebe II

Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:22 PM

Obviously depends on the volume, but I use the trusted disposable nappies to mop up any spills
  • 0
boots (nb: Phoebe II)

#15 Monkey 1

Monkey 1

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:30 PM

If you're using Gunk, it's a degreaser anyway. Using detergents is a waste of time and money, all you're doing is bulking up the mess and adding more chemicals. Garages and the like have used sawdust for donkeys years and still do because it works best being very absorbent cheap and disposable and easy to clear up with a hoover, leaves bilges spotlessly clean if you scoosh it around enough.

KISS


I agree yes.

But ALL of my metalwork looks & feels greasy to the touch, not just the bilge floor. When it rains this washes a small amount down onto the bilge floor. Gunk is excellent for de greasing engines so I guess it'll do a sterling job of my bilge sides Posted Image

I notice you are in Dorset DT6? I used to live there too, really miss it.

Edited by Monkey 1, 02 May 2012 - 06:30 PM.

  • 0
"What value is material comfort, if the price is your freedom"

#16 steamraiser2

steamraiser2

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 367 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:dorset

Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:41 PM

Get yourself a vacuum oil pump from Machine Mart or similar place. You can collect 90% of the oil and water easily. You can empty it into a drum for disposal at the recycling centre. Just pump the handle and suck it all up .It also has the advantage of making your engine oil changes easy as you can suck out the oil through the dipstick hole. Most industrial or hydraulic supplies merchants sell a gritty oil absorbent which is like big boys cat litter. Soaks up whats left enabling it to be hoovered up with a Wetvac or Henry etc. If you want to get really serious and clean the metal of oil residue you will get good results from a can of brake cleaner. Wipe on and wipe off with kimwipes/j cloth or similar. VENTILATE THE BOAT. DON'T SMOKE. It evaporates very quickly.
  • 0

#17 Robbo

Robbo

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,651 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Leeds

Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:46 PM

I originally got rid of the oil/water in a drum to the local tip but ended up with a residue at the bottom of the engine bay that as soon as water gets in im back to square one.
is there some way of cleaning the residue off?


You could use washing bowl containers to catch the any new water or oil drips from the engine?
  • 0

Refitting a Dutch Barge: http://dbhalcyon.wordpress.com/

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/robbo312/ - Mainly pins of boat interiors!


#18 Grace & Favour

Grace & Favour

    Long Standing Member

  • Site Crew
  • 8,437 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:47 PM

Get yourself a vacuum oil pump from Machine Mart or similar place. You can collect 90% of the oil and water easily. You can empty it into a drum for disposal at the recycling centre. Just pump the handle and suck it all up .It also has the advantage of making your engine oil changes easy as you can suck out the oil through the dipstick hole. Most industrial or hydraulic supplies merchants sell a gritty oil absorbent which is like big boys cat litter. Soaks up whats left enabling it to be hoovered up with a Wetvac or Henry etc. If you want to get really serious and clean the metal of oil residue you will get good results from a can of brake cleaner. Wipe on and wipe off with kimwipes/j cloth or similar. VENTILATE THE BOAT. DON'T SMOKE. It evaporates very quickly.


May I respectfully point out that the 'big boys cat litter' is one of the most inefficient, (and expensive to dispose of), absorbents on the market.

A fibrous absorbent is substantially more effective - - if nothing else - even kitchen towel is better than cat litter . . . . . honest! :blush:

I like collecting recipes

I now have a greater number of recipes than the likely number of days remaining to me!

 

 

Don't waste time thinking about what's wrong with yourself. Instead, focus on what's wrong with other people.


#19 cereal tiller

cereal tiller

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,328 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:50 PM

You could use washing bowl containers to catch the any new water or oil drips from the engine?

Good idea,or you could use cat litter in strategicley placed trays?
  • 0

#20 Bobbybass

Bobbybass

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,746 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Boat Name:Sinky

Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:55 PM

hi folks

need to tap the collective experience of the forum.

having got oil in the bottom of my bilges after a gearbox issue and spillage while replacing the gearbox oil.

also got a fair bit of water in from deck boards and have a oil/water mix,

what is the best way/thing to use to break up the oil so i can safely empty the bilges and clean up?

Cheap nappies..
Drop several in and leave them overnight...
  • 1




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users