Jump to content


Photo

Realise What My Life Has Missed !


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Blackcountrymon

Blackcountrymon

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Halesowen

Posted 25 February 2012 - 09:47 AM

Hi I am new to this forum but find it an incredible read. I've just spent the past 9 mths with someone who lives on a narrowboat and it's been magical as most weekends have been spent on her lovely boat.

I suppose it's crossroads time for me and I am seriously considering taking that leap and trying liveaboard even just for 12 mths. This means selling my house in an area I don't like with neighbours who dont speak... All else fails I can sell the boat and move somewhere else...

So - incase you thought I was just getting stuff off my chest here's the question.

From experience is it possible to hold down a full time job (I work in Erdington Bham) and live on a boat? I notice most seem to have retired ...lucky you.. I would dearly love to hear from anyone else who is thinking about this or has done/is doing this... and to all of you currently doing this I take my hat off to you...

Thanks for any feedback
  • 0

#2 matty40s

matty40s

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,213 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Boat Name:Old Friends

Posted 25 February 2012 - 09:53 AM

I think that you will find most on here Aren't retired!!

I have held down full time employment for 95% of my 4 years on board, I worked in London and regionally in East Midlands.
I have not had any real issues sticking to the CC guidelines and have gone much further than the "minimum???" expected, as I like moving the boat around and seeing new places.
You will have to be creative with your car/bike and public transport, but yes, I would say quite easy in the West Midlands given the amount of canals in the area.
  • 0

#3 Alan de Enfield

Alan de Enfield

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,199 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:10 Miles South of Lincoln
  • Boat Name:Juno

Posted 25 February 2012 - 10:13 AM

I'm / we are not yet liveaboards (hope to be soon) but have done a fair bit of investigation into the situation.

As I see it there are very limited options if you work :

a ) Get a residential mooring and treat your boat as a house (but one which you can take on holiday with you)

b ) Become a CC'er (Continuous Cruiser). The problem here is that you need to keep moving - and - not just up and down the same stretch of canal. You will need to move (say) 10 miles, stay for up to 14 days, move another (say) 10 miles, stay for up to 14 days, move another (say) 10 miles, and so on, all the time getting progressively further away from 'work'. As Matty says if you become 'creative' with public transport its 'do-able'.

c ) Get a leisure mooring. The general thoughts seem to be that if you have a leisure mooring (anywhere) you can moor-up anywhere for up to 14 days (unless signposted differently), move a few hundred yards and stay for 14 days, and so on. If you read the guidance 'rules' this seems to be 'legally allowed' but you could be classed as a 'bridge-hopper'

For options B & C What you will need to consider (if you are working 9-5 plus travelling time) is how you will get enough charge back in your batteries, fill up with water, empty your toilet etc etc. I havn't got that one worked out yet.

I'm sure you will get 'been-there, done-it' advice from those in the know but the above is 'how I see it.
  • 0

Edit : My spelling is good spelling, its a bit wobbly, and sometimes the letters are in the wrong place but it is good spelling. (Winnie the Pooh)


#4 RLWP

RLWP

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,511 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kenilworth
  • Boat Name:Tawny Owl

Posted 25 February 2012 - 10:17 AM

Would it be possible to let your house instead of selling it?

Richard
  • 0

Primrose Engineering @Primroseeng

 

Until Dan gets his act together, you can donate to the running costs of the CanalWorld forum via Paypal using the button at the bottom of this page:  btn_donate_LG.gif


#5 blackrose

blackrose

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,543 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 February 2012 - 10:30 AM

Although it's possible to liveaboard, CC and hold down a job, I think the experience of Matty40s and others who do this isn't easy or recommended for someone who's new to boating. I think it's just too much to take on for most mere mortals, especially in winter.

I've lived aboard for nearly 10 years, 7 of which I've had a mooring with shore power, which is just like living in a floating flat (apart from having to fill the water tank and empty the toilet). When I CCd I was a mature student so I had plenty of free time to move the boat, cycle back to get the car, and accomodate the logistics of that freer but more itinerant lifestyle.

Edited by blackrose, 25 February 2012 - 10:33 AM.

  • 0

#6 matty40s

matty40s

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,213 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Boat Name:Old Friends

Posted 25 February 2012 - 10:52 AM

Although it's possible to liveaboard, CC and hold down a job, I think the experience of Matty40s and others who do this isn't easy or recommended for someone who's new to boating. I think it's just too much to take on for most mere mortals, especially in winter.


It is very possible, vastly enjoyable, but yes, you have to be organised and watch the weather.
I came into a marina on Christmas Eve as I was
1.needing some work doing in the engine area which means I couldn't be self sufficient for power and
2. was on the River side of stoppages, which I didn't really want to risk as I have been off the boat for a few days at a time.
Other than that, I really do not like being in a marina, I would love to be out there somewhere with a view from my windows, able to feed the ducks from my hatch, toddle along when I wished, take photo's of new places in many different light and weather conditions etc etc etc.
I much prefer to be out there all year round.
Birmingham would be a great location for me if I was working there, I tend to do long mile/lock munching days on the boat when I move and there are so many canals around Birmingham with good links, and even so many diferent routes through the centre...that it would be a working CC'ers paradise ..........whilst easily exceeding the guidelines requirements.
  • 0

#7 blackrose

blackrose

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,543 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 February 2012 - 11:40 AM

It is very possible, vastly enjoyable, but yes, you have to be organised and watch the weather.
I came into a marina on Christmas Eve as I was
1.needing some work doing in the engine area which means I couldn't be self sufficient for power and
2. was on the River side of stoppages, which I didn't really want to risk as I have been off the boat for a few days at a time.
Other than that, I really do not like being in a marina, I would love to be out there somewhere with a view from my windows, able to feed the ducks from my hatch, toddle along when I wished, take photo's of new places in many different light and weather conditions etc etc etc.
I much prefer to be out there all year round.


I agree, I'd rather be out there too, but having a mooring doesn't necessarily mean being stuck in a marina.

View from my mooring...
Posted Image

I've really got no objections to being stuck here!
  • 0

#8 matty40s

matty40s

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,213 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Boat Name:Old Friends

Posted 25 February 2012 - 11:53 AM

I agree, I'd rather be out there too, but having a mooring doesn't necessarily mean being stuck in a marina.

View from my mooring...
Posted Image

I've really got no objections to being stuck here!


very nice...

you could have photoshopped the yoghurt pots out though.. :lol:

moorings like that are the proverbial hens teeth.............
  • 0

#9 Ace 01

Ace 01

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 179 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Devizes
  • Boat Name:The Cat's Whiskers

Posted 25 February 2012 - 12:00 PM

I agree, I'd rather be out there too, but having a mooring doesn't necessarily mean being stuck in a marina.

View from my mooring...
Posted Image

I've really got no objections to being stuck here!



And nor would I with those views B)


Ann
  • 0
Ann & David

#10 Athy

Athy

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,977 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Upwell, Norfolk
  • Boat Name:Trojan

Posted 25 February 2012 - 01:23 PM

Would it be possible to let your house instead of selling it?

Richard

If, as the OP says, the neighbours don't speak, it should be quiet there.
  • 0
One step beyond

#11 Starcoaster

Starcoaster

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,706 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Boat Name:Springy

Posted 25 February 2012 - 04:03 PM

I'm not retired either... Still some 31 years to go. :blink:

I freelance in my main job, which I can do 90% of from anywhere with an internet connection, so can do from the boat. The other 10% of it is travelling to see clients who could be more or less anywhere geographically, so being on a boat is no different from on land as I still have to go some distance, wherever they are.
I locum in my second job (not very many hours over the course of a year) which again gives me the freedom to be able to move around and work as and when and where it suits me and it ties in with other aspects of my life.
  • 0

Starry Trek- "To boldly go where no Springer has gone before" (Peter Reed)


#12 Blackcountrymon

Blackcountrymon

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Halesowen

Posted 27 February 2012 - 08:38 AM

Hi folks

Thanks so much for the advice and words of wisdom. A mooring would make things a lot easier and I am considering all options. Ideally - if I can moor by a handy train station - that would be good. I may contact you individually with more questions

Thanks again..
  • 0

#13 kiki

kiki

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 525 posts
  • Location:Peak Forest Canal
  • Boat Name:jy praat twak

Posted 27 February 2012 - 02:55 PM

Paul and I both work and have lived aboard for 5 years, even had my student daughter live with us for a year.....find a residential mooring would be my advice, with working and the hours involved in traveling I would not like to complicate things by having to move all the time and trying to empty cassettes and having clean clothes for work etc every day.
  • 0
If life hands you lemons, make lemonade. Then use the profit to buy an assault rifle. See if life makes the same mistake again !

#14 Bimbly1

Bimbly1

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 274 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stourport on Severn
  • Boat Name:Bimble

Posted 27 February 2012 - 08:52 PM

I suppose it's crossroads time for me and I am seriously considering taking that leap and trying liveaboard even just for 12 mths. This means selling my house in an area I don't like with neighbours who dont speak... All else fails I can sell the boat and move somewhere else...

Think you mean you can untie the boat and moor somewhere else? ;)
  • 0
There are 10 types of people in this world: Those who understand binary, and those who don't!


Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you

#15 Blackcountrymon

Blackcountrymon

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Halesowen

Posted 02 March 2012 - 02:47 PM

I'm not retired either... Still some 31 years to go. :blink:

I freelance in my main job, which I can do 90% of from anywhere with an internet connection, so can do from the boat. The other 10% of it is travelling to see clients who could be more or less anywhere geographically, so being on a boat is no different from on land as I still have to go some distance, wherever they are.
I locum in my second job (not very many hours over the course of a year) which again gives me the freedom to be able to move around and work as and when and where it suits me and it ties in with other aspects of my life.



Sounds like you have it sussed - lucky you..!

Would it be possible to let your house instead of selling it?

Richard


Richard

I'm seriously think this and am working out figures etc - is this something you have done?

I think that you will find most on here Aren't retired!!

I have held down full time employment for 95% of my 4 years on board, I worked in London and regionally in East Midlands.
I have not had any real issues sticking to the CC guidelines and have gone much further than the "minimum???" expected, as I like moving the boat around and seeing new places.
You will have to be creative with your car/bike and public transport, but yes, I would say quite easy in the West Midlands given the amount of canals in the area.


Thanks for the advice - there's a lot to consider really and I'm grateful for the help
  • 0

#16 Nb Trikeri

Nb Trikeri

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Boat Name:Trikeri

Posted 02 March 2012 - 03:44 PM

I'm a live aboard, have lived afloat for two years, new to boating and work in Central London.

It works fine for me, but I think you need to be practical as some DIY is required when a water pump goes etc

I live out side London and travel in, and treat the boat as a get away at weekends, and during the weekend as a floating flat. I have a permanent mooring so I don't have the stress of continuous cruising etc.

I have amazing country views on the Thames, and would not change it for the world!

I'm 26 so don't think its just for the retired.
  • 0

#17 Blackcountrymon

Blackcountrymon

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Halesowen

Posted 04 March 2012 - 10:33 AM

I'm a live aboard, have lived afloat for two years, new to boating and work in Central London.

It works fine for me, but I think you need to be practical as some DIY is required when a water pump goes etc

I live out side London and travel in, and treat the boat as a get away at weekends, and during the weekend as a floating flat. I have a permanent mooring so I don't have the stress of continuous cruising etc.

I have amazing country views on the Thames, and would not change it for the world!

I'm 26 so don't think its just for the retired.


Weekend get away and floating flat - yes thats how I see it at the moment. I'm lookinf for moorings as I think that would be sensible early days.

Thanks for the advice

Good luck
  • 0

#18 onthecut

onthecut

    Long Standing Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 640 posts

Posted 04 March 2012 - 12:28 PM

Working in Erdington has to be getting on for a dream ticket if you are looking to combine liveaboard with cc ing, given the multiplicity of local canals and ready public transport and road access to the area. I think you will find much the bigger issue is taking that step from having a house to selling up and moving on board. If there is any way you can manage it, do try and hang on to your house until you have tried at least a few months (like now, when it's cold, raining and dark days) liveaboard. Not only do you need to see what you think when the novelty wears off, but there is the perenially thorny issue of what layout / cost boat you buy. However much you may think you do, you really won't know until you've done it for real just what you want in a liveaboard boat and how you want it laid out.
Even though property prices may be flatlining at present, it's still a big step to get off the ladder.

Mike.
  • 0

#19 Blackcountrymon

Blackcountrymon

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Halesowen

Posted 05 March 2012 - 11:25 PM

Working in Erdington has to be getting on for a dream ticket if you are looking to combine liveaboard with cc ing, given the multiplicity of local canals and ready public transport and road access to the area. I think you will find much the bigger issue is taking that step from having a house to selling up and moving on board. If there is any way you can manage it, do try and hang on to your house until you have tried at least a few months (like now, when it's cold, raining and dark days) liveaboard. Not only do you need to see what you think when the novelty wears off, but there is the perenially thorny issue of what layout / cost boat you buy. However much you may think you do, you really won't know until you've done it for real just what you want in a liveaboard boat and how you want it laid out.
Even though property prices may be flatlining at present, it's still a big step to get off the ladder.

Mike.


Thanks Mike - I think this is good advice about keeping the house and if I can I will. I haven't come across any threats regretting the move onto a nb but I suppose a safety net is not a bad thing.

Thanks again to all
  • 0

#20 i love my narrowboat

i love my narrowboat

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 455 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Boat Name:Cape Clear

Posted 09 March 2012 - 05:04 PM

Hi I am new to this forum but find it an incredible read. I've just spent the past 9 mths with someone who lives on a narrowboat and it's been magical as most weekends have been spent on her lovely boat.

I suppose it's crossroads time for me and I am seriously considering taking that leap and trying liveaboard even just for 12 mths. This means selling my house in an area I don't like with neighbours who dont speak... All else fails I can sell the boat and move somewhere else...

So - incase you thought I was just getting stuff off my chest here's the question.

From experience is it possible to hold down a full time job (I work in Erdington Bham) and live on a boat? I notice most seem to have retired ...lucky you.. I would dearly love to hear from anyone else who is thinking about this or has done/is doing this... and to all of you currently doing this I take my hat off to you...

Thanks for any feedback




Glad you like this site, I am a fairly new member and have found lots of very knowledgable and friendly people on here, if you have a question to ask, someone on here will know the answer :cheers:
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users