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#1 Escape

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 05:05 PM

Ok, so this will probably raise a few eyebrows but everyone has to start somewhere right?
As I am a complete newbie and as the weather is starting to improve somewhat I am starting to plan ahead for my first venture outside of the comfort of my home marina.
This will be my first outing and so given that the entrance to the marina is narrow the entrance to the canal looks so incredibly small when do I begin to instigate my turn?
I should say that I have undoubtably stretched beyond my abilities and have a 57ft narrowboat. I understand the boat pivots in the centre so does that mean I start the turn about midway? If that is the case then there is approximately 30ft of front end sticking out into the channel a little different from nudging a car out from a side to a main road methinks? :blush:
Any suggestions other than take a bus journey will be gratefully appreciated.
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#2 RichardH

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 05:08 PM

Ok, so this will probably raise a few eyebrows but everyone has to start somewhere right?
As I am a complete newbie and as the weather is starting to improve somewhat I am starting to plan ahead for my first venture outside of the comfort of my home marina.
This will be my first outing and so given that the entrance to the marina is narrow the entrance to the canal looks so incredibly small when do I begin to instigate my turn?
I should say that I have undoubtably stretched beyond my abilities and have a 57ft narrowboat. I understand the boat pivots in the centre so does that mean I start the turn about midway? If that is the case then there is approximately 30ft of front end sticking out into the channel a little different from nudging a car out from a side to a main road methinks? :blush:
Any suggestions other than take a bus journey will be gratefully appreciated.


What about taking a 1 day training course. Many instructors will also offer 'own boat' training so you learn on the boat you will be operating. The RYA website has details.
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#3 cheshire~rose

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 05:11 PM

If you can get someone to stand on the bow of your boat to act as a lookout to signal when the coast is clear then that would be ideal. Failing this enlist the help of any gongoozler around. Failing that proceed SLOWLY and give a blast on your horn to warn any traffic on the main channel. It is of course their right of way but they should give you a blast of their horn back if they are approaching and at least you know to hit reverse so as not to ram them. Once you can see the coast is clear don't forget to up the revs sufficiently to give you some decent steering so you don't simply ram the bank on the opposite side of the cut

Oh and relax - everyone started somewhere!
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#4 cotswoldsman

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 05:12 PM

You might get out and never get back in Posted ImagePosted Image
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#5 KevMc

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 05:13 PM

Ok, so this will probably raise a few eyebrows but everyone has to start somewhere right?
As I am a complete newbie and as the weather is starting to improve somewhat I am starting to plan ahead for my first venture outside of the comfort of my home marina.
This will be my first outing and so given that the entrance to the marina is narrow the entrance to the canal looks so incredibly small when do I begin to instigate my turn?
I should say that I have undoubtably stretched beyond my abilities and have a 57ft narrowboat. I understand the boat pivots in the centre so does that mean I start the turn about midway? If that is the case then there is approximately 30ft of front end sticking out into the channel a little different from nudging a car out from a side to a main road methinks? :blush:
Any suggestions other than take a bus journey will be gratefully appreciated.


You could reverse out - tongue firmly in cheek :rolleyes:
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#6 matty40s

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 05:23 PM

You learn best by doing, although a course might be a good idea.
Go slowly, almost to a stop coming out of he marina.
Your tiller will only turn you more up to about 45/50 degrees from the boats axis, ....hard over 90 degrees will not achieve anything more.
Invite someone to join you, even if it is only whilst leaving the marina.

The weather may be looking less windy, but keep an eye out as it is going to get colder......and the models are starting to agree that maybe much colder Easterlies are on the way in a week to 10 days, so be careful that you don't get stranded by ice unless you don't mind.

edited to add, unfortunately, I have a lot of spare time at the moment, I think you are East Midlands, give me a shout if you want some support from a professional Bovril maker

Edited by matty40s, 25 January 2012 - 05:29 PM.

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#7 Darren72

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 06:36 PM

You learn best by doing, although a course might be a good idea.
Go slowly, almost to a stop coming out of he marina.
Your tiller will only turn you more up to about 45/50 degrees from the boats axis, ....hard over 90 degrees will not achieve anything more.
Invite someone to join you, even if it is only whilst leaving the marina.

The weather may be looking less windy, but keep an eye out as it is going to get colder......and the models are starting to agree that maybe much colder Easterlies are on the way in a week to 10 days, so be careful that you don't get stranded by ice unless you don't mind.

edited to add, unfortunately, I have a lot of spare time at the moment, I think you are East Midlands, give me a shout if you want some support from a professional Bovril maker



snow forecast next week
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#8 koukouvagia

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 08:01 PM

This will be my first outing and so given that the entrance to the marina is narrow the entrance to the canal looks so incredibly small when do I begin to instigate my turn?
I should say that I have undoubtably stretched beyond my abilities and have a 57ft narrowboat. I understand the boat pivots in the centre so does that mean I start the turn about midway?


Say you're going to turn right out of the narrow marina entrance. Keep close to the right side of the entrance. In this position as you turn right your stern will move across to the space on the left of the entrance. If you fail to do this you won't be able to turn because your stern will be blocked by the left edge of the entrance.

Edited by koukouvagia, 25 January 2012 - 08:02 PM.

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#9 pquinn

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 08:37 PM

drink some beer or whiskey or whatever you fancy.that way you will have the false confidance to act like you know what you are doing.it works for many,many people in all sorts of boats :blink:
only joking.by all means get someone to help and dont worry to much about going left or right if it is windy.

Edited by pquinn, 25 January 2012 - 08:40 PM.

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#10 Starcoaster

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 08:46 PM

Roughly what area are you based in? You might even get an offer of help from someone on the forum local to you.
I am only about one step ahead of you, having got my boat at the end of October and having only been out on it three times, each of which was with help from the good people of CWDF!

Edited by Starcoaster, 25 January 2012 - 08:47 PM.

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#11 pquinn

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 08:48 PM

if you can get your hands on this book,it is simple and to the point......http://www.amazon.co.uk/Guide-Motor-Barge-Handling/dp/0955035104
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#12 matty40s

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 10:35 PM

if you can get your hands on this book,it is simple and to the point......http://www.amazon.co.uk/Guide-Motor-Barge-Handling/dp/0955035104


no good, he has a narrowboat/...... :P
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#13 Gazboatman

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 01:19 AM

Just go for it, you'll be fine, just take it easy.

My first ever venture was up the Severn from Gloucester and I got all the way to Leeds without touching another boat.

Just take everything slowly, once you're out of the marina, you'll pick it up in no time.
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#14 Escape

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:55 PM

Thanks for all the advice guys and Matty for your offer. I want to do this right and have been toying with the idea of a boat handling course. I have been in touch with Trent Boat Handling and think I might give it a go.
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#15 Richard10002

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 11:04 PM

Once you can see the coast is clear don't forget to up the revs sufficiently to give you some decent steering so you don't simply ram the bank on the opposite side of the cut


If you do hit the opposite bank, (gently if possible), putting the tiller hard over, and increasing the revs, will pivot the boat around it's bow and line you up with the way you want to go. In addition, waggling the tiller will make you turn faster.

I learned the latter technique on an Inland Waterways Helmsmans Course, which I would highly recommend.

Good Luck

Richard
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#16 Naughty Cal

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 08:31 AM

Just get out there and enjoy yourself. There are far too many people who never leave their berths because they are scared. Dont become another one. Boat ownership is supposed to be fun and rewarding. It isnt a scary experience, you may be nervous at first but you will with practice soon wonder what all of the fuss was about. :cheers:
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#17 The Dog House

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 11:11 AM

You could reverse out - tongue firmly in cheek :rolleyes:


We actually do this for two reasons.

1 - it is virtually a dead straight short reverse from our pontoon under the bridge from where this picture is taken onto the navigation. (our boat is the third from the right)

2 - you do have the advantage of emerging onto the cut at the end of the boat where you can see if anything is coming and can wait as appropriate.

Posted Image

We then turn outside the marina which is less disruptive to the other boats with no risk of messing it up and hitting another boat.

(we do have the advantage of a very wide turning space outside mind.

Posted Image

Edited by MJG, 27 January 2012 - 02:41 PM.

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It was someone who's always picking arguments and talking rubbish, as opposed to the Dog House, who sometimes pick arguments but more often than not has the redeeming feature of being right!


#18 KevMc

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 11:38 AM

We then turn outside the marina which is less disruptive to the other boats with no risk of messing it up and hitting another boat.

(we do have the advantage of a very wide turning space outside mind.


And you can come straight in on your return too :captain: good planning :cheers:
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#19 The Dog House

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 12:27 PM

And you can come straight in on your return too :captain: good planning :cheers:


Absolutely - probably one of the jammiest marina mooring spots ever.

Pure fluke that one was becoming free when we enquired.
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It was someone who's always picking arguments and talking rubbish, as opposed to the Dog House, who sometimes pick arguments but more often than not has the redeeming feature of being right!


#20 Naughty Cal

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:00 PM

We actually do this for two reasons.

1 - it is virtually a dead straight short reverse from our pontoon under the bridge from where this picture is taken onto the navigation. (our boat is the third from the right)

2 - you do have the advantage of emerging onto the cut at the end of the boat where you can see if anything is coming and can wait as appropriate.

Posted Image

We then turn outside the marina which is less disruptive to the other boats with no risk of messing it up and hitting another boat.

(we do have the advantage of a very wide turning space outside mind.


Not a bad spot that. We landed one of the tightest spots in our marina, 30ft from the end of the pontoon to the chinese!! We love the spot though and wouldnt change it. The looks on the diners faces as they enjoy lunch on the balcony and then get the anchor of an S23 sweeping past them is a joy to behold :lol:
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