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Single manning of canal boat


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#1 sue1

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 08:52 PM

Hi all, this is one of many question i`ll be putting on this forum, is it possible to cruise around the canal network and deal with lock by yourself, or does it require 2 people, i`m thinking ahead i wish to live on a boat but it will be by myself

Thanks for your help
susan
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#2 sheriff

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 09:00 PM

Hi all, this is one of many question i`ll be putting on this forum, is it possible to cruise around the canal network and deal with lock by yourself, or does it require 2 people, i`m thinking ahead i wish to live on a boat but it will be by myself

Thanks for your help
susan

yes and plenty of single handed females manage by themself...even women on fuel boats...practise/take your time/watch other solo boaters.....IM a single handed boater and manage find.........your find plenty of advice on here from the collective....

good luck............
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#3 sue1

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 09:06 PM

yes and plenty of single handed females manage by themself...even women on fuel boats...practise/take your time/watch other solo boaters.....IM a single handed boater and manage find.........your find plenty of advice on here from the collective....

good luck............

Thanks for that i was worried about that bit, but you have put my mind to rest
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#4 Robbo

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 09:09 PM

Hi all, this is one of many question i`ll be putting on this forum, is it possible to cruise around the canal network and deal with lock by yourself, or does it require 2 people, i`m thinking ahead i wish to live on a boat but it will be by myself


Quick answer is yes. There's a book that's about going it alone (I think that may be the title!) which has some handy tips in it. I'll see if I can find link....

Edit to add: Believe this is the book: Colin Edmondson's Going it Alone - a boater's thoughts on single handed boating (don't have it myself, but it's been recommend here a few times) http://www.canaljunc...singleorder.htm

Edited by Robbo, 24 January 2012 - 09:14 PM.

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#5 rgreg

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 09:12 PM

Read this:
http://www.canaljunc...singleorder.htm
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#6 sociable_hermit

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 09:18 PM

Single width locks are nice, wide locks need a bit of care, swing or lift bridges are a pain.

It's all do-able but sometimes you need to learn some tricks from those who've done it before, so you're wise to ask here.

Single-manning also slows you down at first, so add maybe 30% onto any journey plans from sites like CanalPlanAC. Experienced single boaters are another matter, I've followed individuals in the past and we've had a crew of 2 or 3 and struggled to keep up :)

Edited by sociable_hermit, 24 January 2012 - 09:18 PM.

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#7 sue1

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 09:22 PM

Thanks everyone for you input I`ll get a copy of that booklet and give it a good read
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#8 mykaskin

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 09:22 PM

I'd point out that it would help greatly to learn boating with a crew of at least two until you know how to handle boats and canal structures and be complete aware of all the problems that can befall you. You don't want to 'learn' when you are all alone and trapped in the middle of nowhere.

Good luck,

Mike

ps. for 'learn' read "have a major injury".
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#9 Robbo

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 07:35 PM

Hi all, this is one of many question i`ll be putting on this forum, is it possible to cruise around the canal network and deal with lock by yourself, or does it require 2 people, i`m thinking ahead i wish to live on a boat but it will be by myself


Waterways World magazine has an article for single handling in February's edition.
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#10 Davidss

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 08:32 PM

This thread contains relevant advice and comments about buoyancy aids, relevant to single manning on a canal boat.

Re the booklet, treat it as a 'thought provoker', not a bible. If you aren't sure of a suggestion, think up what you would do instead.
TBH, it's a bit chicken and egg, practicing as part of a double act is fine, but until you have done a bit of single manning you might not appreciate just what differences you have to work into your procedures, or your boat design / layout.

HTH

Edited by Davidss, 25 January 2012 - 08:33 PM.

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#11 Scholar Gypsy

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 08:07 AM

I would commend a light line running along the roof from the stern, connected to a bowline/loop in the bow rope.

Very handy when using ladders to climb out of an empty lock - you just take the line with you and then do the awkward bit of pulling up a heavy bow rope when you are safely on the lockside.

You can see it in ready for use here and in action (sort of) here.
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#12 luctor et emergo

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:15 AM

Waterways World magazine has an article for single handling in February's edition.


yeah, just read that. why oh why, tie the boat down in a narrow lock?? And bow and stern? Please ignore the advise from that article...
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#13 Robbo

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:18 AM

yeah, just read that. why oh why, tie the boat down in a narrow lock?? And bow and stern? Please ignore the advise from that article...


If you have a smaller than lock boat it is very useful to keep control of the boat especially if it's quite a violent lock.
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#14 luctor et emergo

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:30 AM

If you have a smaller than lock boat it is very useful to keep control of the boat especially if it's quite a violent lock.


yes, with the centre line. half turn round bollard if needed, always controlled, in the hand, by the boater. Tying boat down with two ropes is recipe for disaster.
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#15 Robbo

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:37 AM

yes, with the centre line. half turn round bollard if needed, always controlled, in the hand, by the boater. Tying boat down with two ropes is recipe for disaster.


I find the centre line never stops the boat from going forward or back enough as there's never a centre bollard in the right place. I don't tie, I use just wrap the rope around the bollard about 4 times. That way I can control both if needed from afar. I'm 50ft by 12ft, so on most locks I have width to control a well..
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#16 IanM

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:53 AM

If you have a smaller than lock boat it is very useful to keep control of the boat especially if it's quite a violent lock.


Surely being 'delicate' with the paddles would be a better idea?

Watch the boat and raise the paddles accordingly.
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#17 furnessvale

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 10:39 AM

Hi all, this is one of many question i`ll be putting on this forum, is it possible to cruise around the canal network and deal with lock by yourself, or does it require 2 people, i`m thinking ahead i wish to live on a boat but it will be by myself

Thanks for your help
susan


Just relax and work safely. If you are alone at a lock you have all the time in the world. If others are queueing they will help you through or continue to queue, their choice.

George ex nb Alton retired

Edited by furnessvale, 26 January 2012 - 10:39 AM.

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#18 Robbo

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 10:40 AM

Surely being 'delicate' with the paddles would be a better idea?

Watch the boat and raise the paddles accordingly.


I'm on the Aire and Calder, our locks are automated, but I still find on manual locks it's better for me.

Edited by Robbo, 26 January 2012 - 10:40 AM.

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#19 IanM

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 11:26 AM

I'm on the Aire and Calder, our locks are automated, but I still find on manual locks it's better for me.


Fair enough Posted Image
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#20 ditchcrawler

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 12:05 PM

yeah, just read that. why oh why, tie the boat down in a narrow lock?? And bow and stern? Please ignore the advise from that article...

I am glad I wasn't the only one to say that .
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